Class Notes (836,148)
Canada (509,657)
Geography (806)
GEOG 210 (123)
Jon Unruh (119)
Lecture 4

GEOG 210 Lecture 4 Notes

5 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GEOG 210
Professor
Jon Unruh
Semester
Winter

Description
Global Places and People Thursday January 16, 2014  Lecture 4 (Missed Previous Lecture) • Review • *know peripheries  • The evolution of the modern world­system has exhibited distinctive stages • Each has left its legacy in different ways on particular places • The modern world­system was first established over a long period that began in  the late fifteenth century Evolution of the Modern World­ System • At the end of the eighteenth century, the new technologies of the industrial  revolution brought about the emergence of a global economic system that reached  into almost every part of the world and into virtually every aspect of people’s  lives. • Globalization has intensified the differences between the core and periphery • Such that there has emerged a digital divide between a: • Fast world (about 15 percent of the worlds population and a slower population  (about 85 perent) • The fast and the slow have contrasting lifestyles and style of living • ­­ not finishing slides— Agricultural Landscapes • types and methods of agriculture • Subsistence Agriculture: farming for direct consumption by the producers, not for  sale • Commercial Agriculture: Farming primarily for sale, not for direct consumption • Shifting Cultivation: a system in which farmers aim to maintain soil fertility by  rotating the fields within which cultivation occurs. • You go in, you cut the land, plant something, no pesticides, fertilizers, bugs find  crops, have to abandon it, go to a new place and cut a new spot­ the place you left  must recover before you can go back and cut it again. • Crop Rotation: a method of maintaining soul fertility in which the fields under  cultivation remain the same, but the crops being planted are changed—things are  more intense­ renewing fertility by planting something different opposed to the  same thing all the time  Traditional and Industrialized Agriculture • The industrialized agricultural system of todays world has deveopled from older  agricultureal practives including: shifting cultivation, subsistence agriculture • Subsistence Agricultural Areas • Traditional Agriculture: Crop Cultivation • Shifting Cultivation • A form of agriculture usually found in tropical forest • A system in which farmers cut a field from a forest, burn the cut trees, plant crops  in cleared land, cultivate fields for 2­5 years after which soil fertility declines,  pest infestation increase • Land must be abandoned  • Shifting Cultivation­ the abandoned land then undergoes ‘sucession’  • Succession­ when one set of plants naturally gives sucession to another set of  plants  • After which it can be cleared again for agriculture • Look at picture­ trees • How people deal with a reducing fallow period  • Shifting cultivation is mostly in the tropics especially in the rainforests of central  and west Africa; the amazon in south America and much of southeast Asia. • Shifting cultivation occurs where climate, rainfall, and vegetation combine to  produce soul lacking nutrients • Instead the nutrients are stored in standing biomass­ the rainforest • A commong practive for shifting cultivators in tropical forests is to attempt to  mimic the diversity of the rainforest by planting different crops together in the  same field • This has several benefits: spreading out food production over the cropping season,  reduction of losses due to disease and pests, protection from loss of soil moisture,  control of soil erosion • Mimicking natural vegetation keeps pests away • Cant use a machine to harvest everything­ plants are different­ labour intensive • The practices involved in shifting cultivation have changed very little over  thousands of years • While shifting cultivation requires less energy than modern farming, it can  successfully support only low population densities. • Does not require much energy but does not feed a lot of people • LAND RIGHTS­ • Shifting cultivation­ a small group of villagers holds land in ‘common tenure’ • Through collective agreement or a council: • Sites are distributed among village families, then cleared for planting by family  members • As villages increase their populations: sites must be located farther and farther  away or the fallow period must decrease  • Problem­ increasingly, population pressures and government policies are  undermining the practicality of shifting cultivation, • Resulting in damage to the environment in many parts of the world • In central and South America, national governments have used rural resettlement  pr
More Less

Related notes for GEOG 210

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit