Class Notes (835,495)
Canada (509,212)
Geography (806)
GEOG 210 (123)
Jon Unruh (119)
Lecture 6

GEOG 210 Lecture 6

4 Pages
142 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GEOG 210
Professor
Jon Unruh
Semester
Winter

Description
GEOG 210 Thursday January 23, 2014 Lecture 6 Identity and Landscapes  • Hierarchy of identity▯Family, Religion, Ethnicity, Geography, Work group, Socio  Economic Class▯Identity is like a list and you can switch—order switches, ex,  from class to home with family to work group, etc. Processes: 1.Landscape as contested terrain 2.Landscape as learning 3.Landscape as language  1. Process­Landscape as Contested Terrain • Landscape has provided the raw material for ideas and images of territorial places  and identities▯be they empires, nations, regions or localities • These landscapes have been culturally reproduced (encouraged, enhanced) • The end product of these cultural processes are diverse, they are landscapes of: • Honor and virtue, bountiful resources, future wealth and most commonly, they are  landscapes of distinction • The reason we don’t all have the same identity as humans on earth is because of  the distinction of landscapes  • Other nations and regions have different landscapes and, by implication, different  identities  • Such landscapes have been used and abused for purposes of: Power and Control • For the conscious or unconscious construction of belonging and identity • And for the production and formatting of citizens and their self­understanding as a  people  • Different processes work to describe and re­describe landscapes in the way of  shaping and regional images and identities  • Cultural interactions with landscape—ox and plow in Ethiopia­ we see it as  irrelevant  • Some landscapes are more highly valued than others for their role in identity  formation  How this ‘valuing’ occurs gives important clues to the understanding of  nations and regions  For example: Canada: Wildness= Unpolluted landscape, deeply embedded  2. Process: Landscape as Learning • We earn (from school, family, friends, folklore) how national landscapes are  determined by:  Events, or memories of events  Often connected to ▯ royalty, nobility, elite presence, war, or to significant  turning points in the memory of the nation  Cancun, Mexico, The French Riviera; & California can be called  ‘international landscapes’­if not ‘globalized landscapes’  In the sense that they are known (leanred0 almost universally and serve as  objects of pilgrimage as tourist resorts for people far beyond Mexico, France  and the United States • Their ‘careers’ as places have been possible through an international set of:  Celebrities, movies, media, and popular culture▯depending on who and where you   are • A national level landscape works in a similar way, although it may not be well  known outside a particular country • Ex. The royal Tombs is a commonplace concept to this­ probably less known to:  Greeks, Norwegians, Finns, Chinese, Canadians  • A person who has not been a member of the national cultural learning process, or  exposed to the articulation of the mental landscape of his/her community, will not  know these places& concepts  • Places influence identity­ where you are from you understand what goes on­  political, social, etc. ▯ tourists know next to nothing▯”insider vs. outsider” • Idea of a ‘mental lap’ in terms of reading landscapes 3. Process: Landscape as Language • The process of articulation of territory  • Ex. Uluru, the famous stone formation in the interior of Australia  • The reason that Uluru is famous is that it is covered by ‘text’ or  ‘language’▯In other words the landscape ‘says something’ • Other areas around the rock are less significant  • There is a story of aboriginal culture and religion, geological features, the  quest across the continent in the previous century  • The landscape is also saying▯There is a tourist resort­ the fact that the  resort is there shows the idea of landscape as language  • We can see similar processes at work everywhere • In small nations and big ones  • It is the process of: • Differentiating one area from another, establishing communities of  affection and memory, t
More Less

Related notes for GEOG 210

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit