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Lecture 4

MATH 140 Lecture Notes - Lecture 4: Exponential Function, Irrational Number, Rational Number


Department
Mathematics & Statistics (Sci)
Course Code
MATH 140
Professor
Ewa Duma
Lecture
4

Page:
of 3
MATH140 - Lecture 4 Notes
Exponential Functions:
Exponential function is dependent on the increasing or decreasing function. In general,
it is of the form f(x) = a^x where a is a positive constant.
To understand exponential functions, first look at the graph of an exponential function.
36. The first graph in the figure is that of as displayed
by a TI-83 graphing calculator. It is inaccurate and so, to help
explain its appearance, we replot the curve in dot mode in the
second graph.
What two sine curves does the calculator appear to be plotting?
Show that each point on the graph of that the TI-
83 chooses to plot is in fact on one of these two curves. (The
TI-83’s graphing window is 95 pixels wide.)
y!sin 45x
0 2π0 2π
y!sin 45x
(b) Graph the function using the viewing rectangle
by . How does this graph differ from the
graph of the sine function?
35. The figure shows the graphs of and as
displayed by a TI-83 graphing calculator.
The first graph is inaccurate. Explain why the two graphs
appear identical. [Hint: The TI-83’s graphing window is 95
pixels wide. What specific points does the calculator plot?]
y=sin96x
0 2π
y=sin2x
0 2π
y!sin 2xy !sin 96x
!!1.5, 1.5"!!5, 5"
y!sin#x2$
EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS
The function is called an exponential function because the variable, x, is the
exponent. It should not be confused with the power function , in which the vari-
able is the base.
In general, an exponential function is a function of the form
where is a positive constant. Let’s recall what this means.
If , a positive integer, then
nfactors
If , and if , where is a positive integer, then
If is a rational number, , where and are integers and , then
But what is the meaning of if xis an irrational number? For instance, what is meant by
or ?
To help us answer this question we first look at the graph of the function , where
xis rational. A representation of this graph is shown in Figure 1. We want to enlarge the
domain of to include both rational and irrational numbers.
There are holes in the graph in Figure 1 corresponding to irrational values of x. We want
to ll in the holes by dening , where , so that is an increasing function.
In particular, since the irrational number satisfies
1.7 "s3 "1.8
s3
fx !!f#x$!2x
y!2x
y!2x
5
#
2s3
ax
ax!ap%q!q
sap!
(
q
sa
)
p
q$0qpx !p%qx
a!n!1
an
nx !!nx !0, then a0!1
an!a"a"%%% "a
x!n
a
f#x$!ax
t#x$!x2
f#x$!2x
1.5
52
||| |
CHAPTER 1 FUNCTIONS AND MODELS
FIGURE 1
Representation of y=2®, x rationa
l
x
0
y
1
1
NIn Appendix G we present an alternative
approach to the exponential and logarithmic
functions using integral calculus.
Based on an understanding of the graph, we can use the concept of 1:1 to understand
whether a function is valid. What we mean by this 1:1 is that no two points go to the
same x value.
Definition: A one to one function is a function where every x has at most one y. No two
values of x give the same f(x) and no two values of y come from the same x. Formally,
f(x) is one to one if: x1 x2 󲎘 f^-1(y) = x
Now that we know exponential functions are valid because they pass the 1:1 test, we
can examine their properties. Below is a graph of members of the family of functions y =
a^x where there are varying values of the base a. All the graphs pass through the same
point (0, 1) because a^0 = 1 for a 0. There are three essential points to exponential
functions:
If 0 < a < 1, then the exponential function decreases
If a = 1, it is a constant
If a > 1, it increases
Note, as the base a gets larger, the exponential function grows more rapidly (for x
> 0)
SECTION 1.5 EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS
||||
53
we must have
and we know what and mean because 1.7 and 1.8 are rational numbers. Similarly,
if we use better approximations for , we obtain better approximations for :
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
It can be shown that there is exactly one number that is greater than all of the numbers
...
and less than all of the numbers
...
We define to be this number. Using the preceding approximation process we can com-
pute it correct to six decimal places:
Similarly, we can define (or , if ) where xis any irrational number. Figure 2
shows how all the holes in Figure 1 have been filled to complete the graph of the function
.
The graphs of members of the family of functions are shown in Figure 3 for var-
ious values of the base a. Notice that all of these graphs pass through the same point
because for . Notice also that as the base agets larger, the exponential func-
tion grows more rapidly (for ).
You can see from Figure 3 that there are basically three kinds of exponential functions
. If , the exponential function decreases; if , it is a constant; and if
, it increases. These three cases are illustrated in Figure 4. Observe that if ,a!1a!1
a"10 "a"1y"ax
FIGURE 3 0
1.5®
10®
®
1
4
®
1
2
x
y
1
x!0
a!0a0"1
!0, 1"
y"ax
f!x""2x, x!!
a!0ax
2x
2s3#3.321997
2s3
21.73206, 21.7321, 21.733, 21.74, 21.8,
21.73205, 21.7320, 21.732, 21.73, 21.7,
1.73205 "s3 "1.73206 ?21.73205 "2s3"21.73206
1.7320 "s3 "1.7321 ? 21.7320 "2s3"21.7321
1.732 "s3 "1.733 ? 21.732 "2s3"21.733
1.73 "s3 "1.74 ? 21.73 "2s3"21.74
2s3
s3
21.8
21.7
21.7 "2s3"21.8
x
1
0
y
1
F IGURE 2
y
=2®, x real
NA proof of this fact is given in J. Marsden
and A. Weinstein,
Calculus Unlimited
(Menlo
Park, CA: Benjamin/Cummings, 1981). For an
online version, see
www.cds.caltech.edu/~marsden/
volume/cu/CU.pdf
NIf , then approaches as
becomes large. If , then approaches
as decreases through negative values. In both
cases the -axis is a horizontal asymptote. These
matters are discussed in Section 2.6.
x
x
0ax
a!1
x0ax
0"a"1
Laws of Exponents:
If a and b are positive numbers and x and y are any real numbers, then there are four
rules to consider:
then the exponential function has domain !and range . Notice also that,
since , the graph of is just the reflection of the graph of
about the -axis.
One reason for the importance of the exponential function lies in the following proper-
ties. If xand yare rational numbers, then these laws are well known from elementary
algebra. It can be proved that they remain true for arbitrary real numbers xand y. (See
Appendix G.)
LAWS OF EXPONENTS If aand bare positive numbers and xand yare any real
numbers, then
1. 2.3. 4.
EXAMPLE 1 Sketch the graph of the function and determine its domain and
range.
SOLUTION First we reflect the graph of [shown in Figures 2 and 5(a)] about the
x-axis to get the graph of in Figure 5(b). Then we shift the graph of
upward 3 units to obtain the graph of in Figure 5(c). The domain is !and
the range is .
M
EXAMPLE 2 Use a graphing device to compare the exponential function
and the power function . Which function grows more quickly when xis large?
SOLUTION Figure 6 shows both functions graphed in the viewing rectangle
by . We see that the graphs intersect three times, but for the graph of x!4!0, 40"
!"2, 6"
t#x$!x2
f#x$!2x
V
F I G U RE 5
0
1
(a) y=2®
x
y
0
_1
(b) y=_2®
x
y
y=3
0
2
(c) y=3-2®
x
y
#"#, 3$
y!3"2x
y!"2x
y!"2x
y!2x
y!3"2x
#ab$x!axbx
#ax$y!axy
ax"y!ax
ay
ax$y!axay
1(0,1)
(a) y=a®, 0<a<1 (b) y=1® (c) y=a®, a>1
(0,1)
FIGURE 4
x
0
y
x
0
y
x
0
y
yy !ax
y!#1%a$x
#1%a$x!1%ax!a"x
#0, #$y!ax
54
||||
CHAPTER 1 FUNCTIONS AND MODELS
www.stewartcalculus.com
For review and practice using the Laws of
Exponents, click on Review of Algebra.
NFor a review of reflecting and shifting graphs,
see Section 1.3.
Examples of exponential functions:
then the exponential function has domain !and range . Notice also that,
since , the graph of is just the reflection of the graph of
about the -axis.
One reason for the importance of the exponential function lies in the following proper-
ties. If xand yare rational numbers, then these laws are well known from elementary
algebra. It can be proved that they remain true for arbitrary real numbers xand y. (See
Appendix G.)
LAWS OF EXPONENTS If aand bare positive numbers and xand yare any real
numbers, then
1. 2.3. 4.
EXAMPLE 1 Sketch the graph of the function and determine its domain and
range.
SOLUTION First we reflect the graph of [shown in Figures 2 and 5(a)] about the
x-axis to get the graph of in Figure 5(b). Then we shift the graph of
upward 3 units to obtain the graph of in Figure 5(c). The domain is !and
the range is .
M
EXAMPLE 2 Use a graphing device to compare the exponential function
and the power function . Which function grows more quickly when xis large?
SOLUTION Figure 6 shows both functions graphed in the viewing rectangle
by . We see that the graphs intersect three times, but for the graph of x!4!0, 40"
!"2, 6"
t#x$!x2
f#x$!2x
V
#"#, 3$
y!3"2x
y!"2x
y!"2x
y!2x
y!3"2x
#ab$x!axbx
#ax$y!axy
ax"y!ax
ay
ax$y!axay
1(0,1)
(a) y=a®, 0<a<1 (b) y=1® (c) y=a®, a>1
(0,1)
FIGURE 4
x
0
y
x
0
y
x
0
y
yy !ax
y!#1%a$x
#1%a$x!1%ax!a"x
#0, #$y!ax
54
||| |
CHAPTER 1 FUNCTIONS AND MODELS
www.stewartcalculus.com
For review and practice using the Laws of
Exponents, click on Review of Algebra.
NFor a review of reflecting and shifting graphs,
see Section 1.3.
Domain of a function:
Given a function f(x), its domain is the set of values of x for which it is defined. Below
are some common domains:
The domain of any polynomial is ANY REAL NUMBERS (-inf, inf)
The domain of sqrt(f(x)) is the set of x values such that f(x) 0
The domain of 1/f(x) is the set of x values such that f(x) 0
The domain of arccos(x) and arcsin(x) is [-1, 1]
The domain of sin(x) and cos(x) is ANY REAL NUMBERS
To find the domain of a given function, you might have to combine different domains to
get the final result.
Example: Find the domain of f(x) = sqrt(x-2)/(x^2-9)
For the numerator we want x 2
For the fraction we want x^2 - 9 0 > x 3, x -3 therefore… the domain is [2,3) U (3,
inf)