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Lecture 10

MGCR 222 Lecture Notes - Lecture 10: Job Satisfaction, Situational Leadership Theory, Servant LeadershipPremium

6 pages49 viewsFall 2015

Department
Management Core
Course Code
MGCR 222
Professor
Jean- Nicolas Reyt
Lecture
10

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MGCR222Lecture10Leadership
1. Aspects of Leadership
Leadership is the process of directing and influencing people toward attaining defined
organizational goals --> 'generative tasks'
Managers is controlling people or things like planning and budgeting --> implementation
Difference between 'leaders' and 'managers'
Different tasks and roles, not necessarily different people
3 main functions of leaders
a. Deciding on the organization’s mission and how to accomplish it
Why do organizations need a vision?
To communicate shared values and goals
To recognize and promote the distinctiveness of the organization
To provide template for decision making (recruiting, strategy)
To provide sense of identity and community
Elements of a visions
Be clear and consistent
Have personal relevance and meaning to the listener
For employees, explain how their work is important and how it
fits into goals of org
Requires emotional intelligence
Provide a sense of consistent guidance and direction
Leaders should embody values reflected in vision
Communicate a clear end goal (desirable future state)
A compelling improvement over the status quo
b. Generating support for the mission
Effectively communicating it to others/getting them on board
Communication is one of the more tangible and important aspects of
leadership
Relate to the audience
Don’t 'speak down' to them, use colloquial terms and language
Foster feelings of similarity, common identity
Non-verbals
Use of emotion to avoid monotony and emphasize key points
Confident, relaxed but assertive and fairly loud
Upright and expansive posture
Inspiring and motivating (at a broad level)
Leaders can and should develop an understanding of followers (need
to know who you are leading, what they care about, etc)
Be mindful of effects of their own and others behav
Weigh the impact of behaviour on others
Implementing change when necessary
c. Setting the tone for behaviour within the organization
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'face' of the organization, to internal members, and external constituencies
Influence culture, norms, etc
Definitions
Leadership - the process of guiding and directing the behaviour of people in the work
environment
Formal leadership - the officially sanctioned leadership based on the authority of a
formal position
Informal leadership - the unofficial leadership accorded to a person by other members
of the organization
Followership- the process of being guided and directed by a leader in the work
environment
2. Early Leadership Theories
a. Traits Theories
Focused on leaders traits as characteristics that differentiate them from non-leaders
Physical attributes, personality characteristics, social skills, speech fluency,
intelligence
Might be used as basis for selecting 'right' people to assume formal leadership
positions
Proved to be impossible to identify a set of traits that would always differentiate
leaders from non-leaders
Explanations based on traits ignored interactions of leaders, their groups, and
situational factors
b. Behavioural Theories
Knowing what effective leaders would do provides the basis for training leaders
University of Iowa Studies explored 3 leadership styles
Autocratic- leader dictated work methods
Democratic- involved employees in decision making used feedback to
coach employees
Laissez-faire - gave the group complete freedom
Ohio state Theories identified 2 dimensions of leadership
Initiating structure
Extent to which a leader was likely to define and structure
their role and roles of group members to seek goal attainment
Consideration
Extent to which leaders had job relationships characterized by
mutual trust and respect for group members ideas and
feelings
Leaders can be either high or low on one or both dimensions
High-high leaders achieved high group task performance and
satisfactions
University of Michigan Studies - identified 2 dimensions of leadership
Employee oriented: emphasized interpersonal relationships
Accepts individual differences among subordinates
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