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Lecture

PATH 603 Lecture Notes - Ferrari 290 Mm, Cornish Chicken, Drop Shot


Department
Pathology
Course Code
PATH 603
Professor
Sonya Laszlo

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Badminton
A. History
There are various accounts of how and when the game of badminton started. It is
commonly accepted that a game with rackets and shuttlecocks was played at the estate of
the Duke of Beaufort in Gloucestershire, England in 1873. The game was named
Badminton after the name of the estate. It came about through a combination of two
games: poona, and battledore and shuttlecocks. For poona, an Indian game, a parchment
ball is batted over a net with rackets. It was learned by British army officers stationed in
India, and subsequently brought back to England by them. Battledore and shuttlecock has
been played in Europe and the orient for at least 2000 years. For it, contestants bat a
shuttlecock back and forth, without permitting the shuttlecock to touch the ground, and
without the use of a net.
From this starting point the game was played in various forms in different countries. In
1877 at Karachi in India, the first attempt was made to form a set of rules. The game
developed in other areas of the world and it became essential that an acceptable standard set
of rules should be devised. In 1893, the Badminton Association of England was formed
and a standard set of Laws for the Game was devised.
B. Equipment and Facilities
1. The Court
1.1 The court shall be a rectangle and laid out as in diagram below and to the measurements
there shown, defined by lines 40 mm wide. The recommended headroom is between 6.1
metres and 9.2 metres.
1.2 For safety reasons, there should be a space of 1 m outside the sidelines and 2 metres
beyond the back boundary lines which is free from any obstructions.
1.3 The lines shall be easily distinguished and preferably be coloured white or yellow.
2. The Posts and Net
2.1 The posts shall be 1.55 metres in height from the surface of the court. They shall be
sufficiently firm to remain vertical and keep the net strained.
2.2 The net shall be made of fine cord of dark colour and even thickness with a mesh not less
than 15 mm and not more than 20 mm.
2.3 The net shall be 760 mm in depth.
2.4 The top of the net shall be edged with a 75 mm white tape doubled over a cord or cable
t\running through the tape. This tape must rest upon the cord or cable.
2.5 The top of the net from the surface of the court shall be 1.524 metres at the centre of the
court and 1.55 metres over the sidelines for doubles.
2.6 There shall be no gaps between the ends of the net and the posts. If necessary, the full
depth of the net should be tied at the ends.
3. Shuttle

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3.1 The shuttle may be made from natural and/or synthetic materials.
3.2 The shuttle shall have 16 features fixed in the base.
3.3 The shuttle shall weight from 4.74 to 5.50 grams.
3.4 To test a shuttle, use a full underhand stroke which makes contact with the shuttle over
the back boundary line. The shuttle shall be hit an upward angle and in a direction
parallel to the sidelines. A shuttle of correct pace will land not less than 530 mm and not
more than 990 mm short of the other back boundary line.
4. Racke t
4.1 The racket can be made of different materials such as wood, metal, carbon graphite,
boron, etc. Most rackets nowadays are made of carbon graphite shafts or boron shafts.
Very rarely are rackets made of wood.
4.2 The frame of the racket, including the handle, shall not exceed 680 mm in overall length
and 230 mm in overall width. The overall length of the head shall not exceed 290 mm.
C. Basic Skills
1. Serving
- Standing with feet front and back, arms open, holding shuttle in front and racket at the
back.
- During hitting, the centre of gravity transfers from the rear foot to the front; rotate the body
from waist to shoulder, swing racket forward, hit the shuttle at the height between
waist and knee, then follow through.
1.1 High serve
1.1.1 Grippingforehand
1.1.2 Impact pointin front of the gripping hand, at the height of knee
1.1.3 Direction of racket faceup and front
1.1.4 Objectivehit the shuttle up and high, from mid-court to opponent’s rear court,
1.1.5 Aimmove the opponent to the rear court, empty space appears at the front court area
1.2 Short serve
1.2.1 Grippingforehand, backhand, or flat grip
1.2.2 Impact pointin front of the gripping hand, below waist
1.2.3 Direction of racket faceup and front
1.2.4 Objectivehit the shuttle up and high, from mid-court to opponent’s front court,
1.2.5 Aimmove the opponent to the front court, empty space appears at the rear court area
1.3 Flick serve
1.3.1 Grippingforehand, backhand, or flat grip
1.3.2 Impact pointin front of the gripping hand, between waist and knee
1.3.3 Direction of racket faceup and front
1.3.4 Objectivehit the shuttle up and high, from nid-court to opponents rear court,

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1.3.5 Aimto change speed, error or weak return may made by opponent
2. Overhead Strokes
2.1 Skill analysis
2.1.1 Preparation phase – feet standing front and back, foot of gripping hand at back, elbow at
right angle, racket pointing upwards, body weight on rear foot
2.1.2 Hitting phase - the centre of gravity transfers from the rear foot to the front; rotate the
body from waist to shoulder, elbow raised to ears height with racket
point downward
2.1.3 Contact phase – elbow extends forearm pronation, hits the shuttle at the desirable point.
2.1.4 Follow through – after hitting, swing racket forward and down, stop at the non-gripping
hand side
2.2 Description of strokes
2.2.1 Forehand clear
2.2.1.1 Grippingforehand
2.2.1.2 Impact pointabove and behind the body
2.2.1.3 Direction of racket faceup and front
2.2.1.4 Objectivehit the shuttle up and high, from rear court to opponents rear court,
2.2.1.5 Aimmove the opponent to the rear court, empty space appears at the front court area
2.2.2 Smash
2.2.2.1 Grippingforehand
2.2.2.2 Impact pointabove and in front of the body
2.2.2.3 Direction of racket facefront and downward
2.2.2.4 Objectivehit the shuttle downward forcefully, from mid-court to opponent’s
mid-court
2.2.2.5 Aimto kill and win the rally
2.2.3 Drop shot
2.2.3.1 Grippingforehand
2.2.3.2 Impact pointabove and in front of the body
2.2.3.3 Direction of racket facefront and downward
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