Class Notes (834,152)
Canada (508,380)
Philosophy (438)
PHIL 375 (8)
Lecture

PHIL 375 - Nietzsche: On Truth and Lying in a Non-Moral Sense

2 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 375
Professor
Susan Judith Hoffmann
Semester
Fall

Description
Part One “How shadowy and transient, how aimless and arbitrary the human intellect looks within nature.” The human “intellect unfolds its principle powers in dissimulation, which is the means by which weaker, less robust individuals preserve themselves.” At the same time, humans also desire a social existence. This drive for peace brings the need for “a uniformly valid and binding designation... for things, and this legislation of language likewise establishes the first laws of truth.” The designations that are found in language are wholly arbitrary. “The 'thing in itself'... is likewise something quite incomprehensible to the creator of language.” “To begin with, a nerve stimulus is transferred into an image: first metaphor. The image, in turn, is imitated in a sound: second metaphor.” “We believe that we know something about the things themselves when we speak of trees, colors, snow, and flowers; and yet we possess nothing but metaphors for things – metaphors which correspond in no way to the original entities.” “A word becomes a concept insofar as it simultaneously has to fit countless more or less similar cases... We obtain the concept, as we do the form, by overlooking what is individual and actual; whereas nature is acquainted with no forms and no concepts, and likewise with no species, but only with an X which remains inaccessible and undefinable for us. For even our contrast between individual and species is something anthropomorphic.” “What the is truth? A movable host of metaphors, metonymies, and; anthropomorphisms: in short, a sum of human relationships which have been poetically and rhetorically intensified, transferred, and embellished, and which, after long usage, seem to a people to be fixed, canonical, and binding. Truths are illusions which we have forgotten are illusions – they are metaphors that have become worn out and have been drained of sensuous force, coins which have lost their embossing and are now considered as metal and no longer as coins.” The Drive for Truth “To be truthful means to employ the usual metaphors.... To express it morally, this is the duty to lie according to a fixed convention,
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 375

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit