Class Notes (837,490)
Canada (510,274)
POLI 244 (357)
Lecture

Jack Levy – Misperception and Causes of War.docx

4 Pages
440 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 244
Professor
Mark Brawley
Semester
Fall

Description
Jack Levy – Misperception and Causes of War: • Although some diplomatic historians have given a lot of emphasis to the  misperceptions in the process leading to individual wars, political scientists have  generally minimized and not given importance to them when developing their  theories of causes of war, by focusing only in “rational” models of conflict.    • There are only very few studies that deal with the question of misperceptions and  the causes of war. • Basically, the sources of misperception have been a more widely studied area, yet  the consequences of misperception haven’t. Misperceptions are very common, but  little attention has been given to the question of what kinds of misperceptions are  likely to lead to war, and to the specific theoretical linkages in the way that they  operate.  Forms of misperception: • Some of the different forms of misperception relevant to war are the following  (but these conceptualizations are not very useful). o Diabolical enemy image, o Virile self image o Moral self­ image o Selective inattention o Absence of empathy o Military over­confidence o A leader’s perception of himself o Perception of adversary’s character o Perception of adversary’s intentions o Perception of adversary’s power and capabilities  o Leader’s capacity of empathy with his counter player on the other side • The concept of misperception is useful only if there exists in principle a  correct perception. By avoiding the question of accuracy of perceptions and by  not isolating and operationalizing the concept of misperception, that concept is  stripped of explanatory power. It becomes impossible to develop hypothesis of  misperception.  • There are 2 main forms of misperceptions important in the intelligence  analysis: misperceptions of the adversary’s capabilities and   intention   . These  kinds of misperceptions can contribute to the process leading to war.  o Other kinds of misperceptions that may lead to war do it through their  effect in the perception of capabilities and intentions. An example of this  is misperception of the perceptions of others: the perceptions of  capabilities and intentions of an actor is misperceived, and also the  broader definition of the situation and the threat that is posed to the actor’s  vital interests is misperceived. This distorts the cost­benefit calculus and  can lead to miscalculations of the consequences of our actions. o Another misperception included in the category of misperception of the  adversary’s intentions is misunderstanding the nature of the decision­ making process of others: this contributes to the inability to understand the  meaning behind the adversary’s actions and the implications of those  actions for future behavior.  • A third important form of misperception is the misperception of third­state  intentions and capabilities: if expectations of the behavior of third states are a  central variable in the causes of war, the misperceptions of the likelihood of third­ state intervention and of military or diplomatic impact of that intervention may be  important variables.   Linkages from misperception to war: Misperceptions of the adversary capabilities:  • In addition to the typical forms of power (military, economic, demographic  dimensions, military potential, etc.), there are many intangibles that are subject  to misperception, such as morale, leadership, the quality of intelligence, but the  nature of the adversary’s military doctrine is very important. Uncertainty or  ignorance of the adversary’s doctrine and its impact on the conduct and outcome  of war is a major source of misperception of overall capabilities.  • Misperceptions of military potential are also very important since they may  determine the outcome of a prolonged war. EX: in both World Wars, Germany  underestimated the military capabilities of the US, and its willingness to devote its  resources to the war • Incorrect expectations of war’s impact in the cohesiveness and political  support in the adversary’s population (or one’s own) is also very important, as  they can have an effect on the ability to actually conduct a war.  • Military overconfidence:  o The most likely misperception to play a critical role in the process leading  to war is the underestimation of the adversary’s capabilities in comparison  to one’s own.  o  It is very unlikely that a state will start a war that it knows it will not w
More Less

Related notes for POLI 244

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit