Class Notes (836,414)
Canada (509,777)
POLI 311 (24)
Lecture 4

Lecture 4.docx

9 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 311
Professor
Christopher Chhim
Semester
Summer

Description
Lecture 4 05/07/2013 Topic 6: Statistics describing variables. Descriptive versus Inferential Statistics Descriptive statistics: Used to describe characteristics of a population or a sample. Inferential Statistics: Used to generalize from a sample to the population from which the sample was drawn. They involve  using a sample to make inferences about the population. Univariate: Used to describe (descriptive) or make inferences (inferential) about the values of a single variable The distribution à how many cases take each value? The central tendency à which is the most typical value? The dispersion à how much do the values vary? The more the data is dispersed the less the  measure of CT will be. Bivariate: Used to describe (descriptive) or make inferences (inferential) about the relationship between the  values of two variables Multivariate: Used to describe (descriptive) or make inferences (inferential) about the relationship among the values  of 3+ variables Describing a distribution: Frequency Distribution: A list of the number of observations in each category of the variable. It displays the frequency with  which each possible value occurs. Called absolute frequencies or raw frequencies. Relative frequencies is just another way of saying percentages. Not desirable to use when you have a small number of cases. Custom in social research is to round percentages as giving specific values gives a false sense of  accuracy that people may apply to the whole population ▯ this is wrong. For both cases make sure you always include total number of frequencies as this is your ‘N’ Central Tendency vs. Dispersion Central Tendency: A measure of central tendency indicates the most typical value, the one value that best  represents the entire distribution. What is the centre of the data? Measure of Dispersion: A measure of dispersion tells us how typical that value is by indicating the extent to  which observations are concentrated in a few categories of the variable or spread  out among all categories . How average is the average value? How good of a job does the CT do? It’s a check on the CT It also looks at co­variation. How much of the data varies? Measuring Central Tendency (Nominal Data): The mode is the most frequently occurring value—the category of the variable that contains  the greatest number of cases. The only operation required is counting. Problem: It disregards the other values. It is a misrepresentation of the entire data set. Measuring Dispersion (Nominal Data): The proportion of cases that do not fall in the modal category tells us just how typical the modal value  is. This is what the textbook calls the variation ratio. How many cases do not fall into the  modal category. So below, 60% of the observation do not fall into the modal  category. Measuring CT (Ordinal Data): The median is the value taken by the middle case in a distribution. It has the same number of  cases above and below
More Less

Related notes for POLI 311

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit