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Lecture

Power.pdf


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLI 244
Professor
Stephen Saideman

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Definition
The ability to get others to do what they would otherwise not do
e.g. USA tried to get countries to join them in the invasion of Iraq - some said yes
because they needed the support of the USA for other projects
Pretty hard to measure
Material capabilities
Population
Existing weapon
Economy
Mobilize-able for war/coercion/resistance
e.g. USA's army
1940, the USA had an ill-equipped military
1944, they were well equipped and well trained
Non-material components
Strategy/knowledge
Reputation
Distribution
Market analogy
Monopoly market creates higher costing goods
Domestic analogy
Who holds the power and how it's managed
e.g. Dictators or federal government?
Polarity
The great powers
USA, China, (potentially India)
The more consuming potential there is, the more powerful they are,
because companies are going to try very hard to be the best option
Different interactions/dynamics
Alliances matter in multipolar situations for instance
Balance vs Preponderance
Balance of power
No one states can be dominant
Does not mean states won't try to be dominant
Preponderance
One single most powerful state
Worse wars come when there are big changes in the great powers' statuses
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