Class Notes (835,727)
Canada (509,353)
RELG 271 (100)
Lecture

RELG 271 Lecture 5

5 Pages
58 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELG 271
Professor
David Jacob Koloszyc
Semester
Winter

Description
Sexual Ethics  Friday January 17, 2014 Lecture 5 Continuing Lecture 4 • According to Foucault, discourse is not just about the way we say things and the  words we use or conversation, discourse actually affects how we structure society,  how we define human relationships, how we experience something physically  • Economic discourse that defines the public discussions about education­ not just  about using economic language it is about the future we are envisioning for our  world—ex, a list of the worst programs to get into, they create a feeling that this is  the only way we can think about education—making it the common sense of our  culture­ not having to think and as k questions­ thinking has become worthless­  economically speaking—we are being forced to put a price on things that should  be priceless­learning—people always try to prove that education is necessary— shows how discourses are being used­ if it continues we will start trying to put  prices on friendships, start competing for friendships  • Economic discourse shapes everything we do today • According to Foucault the dominant discourse is the medical discourse ▯ Foucault  is not saying to not study sexuality medically­ he worries that the medical  industry has invaded in such a serious extent that we cant have a serious  discussion about it  • You cannot discuss sexual pleasure unless it is from a medical perspective­ he  believes it should be a private discussion  • Homosexuality was considered a mental illness until 1972­ it only became  accepted in certain western countries once it was approved by medical institutions  • If it came out today that homosexuality was a disease­ would people believe it  because our beliefs lie in science  • He is interested why this discourse is so dominant that we cannot escape it­ why  we cannot discuss it as something we enjoy­ it has to lead to something defined as  a health issue Sex as ‘Public Interest’ • Victorian myth says they were prudent­ only reason sexuality should be practiced  was for reproduction • Foucault says that it never really happened­ none of the evidence points in that  direction­ if we want to understand that period of time we have to see it like we  look at things today, very complicated  • Asking why we think they were so uncomfortable with sexuality, when they were  the first civilization that created the first sexual discourse about sexuality that was  enforced by doctors  • From the monastery to society – sexuality being discussed as a moral, theological  issue in a public sphere  • From (religious) judgment to (public) management—government statistics­ how  many babies are born, what are people doing, how many prostitues in a place,  how many sexual criminals, etc.  • From condemnation to intervention—instead of saying sexuality is wrong,  government and medical establishements started going in the direction of  interventions­ you try and alter them psychologically, medically, to force their  behavior to go in a different direction • Sex and social policy—all kinds of experts temerged to study sexual behavior­  therapists, councellors, sociologists, anthropologists, started appearing as new  types of scholars focusing only on sexuality as a field of study – came about in the  late 19  century and early 20  century  • Investigating ‘sexual behavior’ Contemporary Discourses on Sex • Religious  • Moral • Medical • Psychiatric  • Economic  • Technological • Legal • Political  The Perverse Implantation  • The imperative of utilthy and (re)production­ has come to dominate sexual  behavior in the late 19  century  • Focus on matrimonial relations  • Juridical prohibitions  • Shift of focus to sexual ‘deviance’  ▯becomes the most facinsating topic for most  scholars­ why didn’t they study ‘normal sexuality’­ Foucault says beause it is  boring­ nobody wants to discuss functional relationship­ people want to hear  about the things they think are weird  • Try to illustrate new kinds of deviances that nobody has ever heard of  • How do you make this deviant behavior into normal, healthy behavior  • Surveillance, rather than censorship Social Results  • Increase in methods of scrutiny/ control  • Sexuality not suppressed, but lured into the open th • Sexual acts become sexual identities ▯ example­ in the 15  century and you were a  man that had a foot fetish, you were just a man who enjoys feet, but at the end of  the 19  century you were a foot fetishist­ you had an identity, it wasn’t just an act  anymore—some people willingly identify themselves as things and Foucault asks  why • Why does it need to be studied or a social identity if somebody just enjoys doing  something   • Reification of a vast sexual mosaic—why do we as a culture value this  Foucault’s ‘Triad’ • You can never separate power, knowledge and pleasure. Wherever you find one,  you will find one of the other 2 Sex and Medical ‘Science’ • Establishing the ‘norm’ ▯ religious discourse had tried to define what is right and  wrong • Medicalization of sex ▯ sex has become medicalized­ taking the place of the  others­ defined on ongoing basis, what is the norm? what is healthy? Why is  socially acceptable or not acceptable, why is psychologically right and wrong? • Values and morals as medical concerns  ▯this was a good way in some ways­ we  have managed to overcome some prejudices based on i
More Less

Related notes for RELG 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit