Class Notes (837,821)
Canada (510,500)
SOCI 225 (52)
Lecture

Medical Sociological Theories.docx

2 Pages
99 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology (Arts)
Course
SOCI 225
Professor
Nicole Mardis
Semester
Winter

Description
The classical theories were introduced to give those who have no understanding of  sociology a bit more information on the roots of the discipline.   It is important for you to understand that early medical sociology involved little social  theory (it was more sociologists working alongside physicians doing research that looked  more like public health research).  Parsons was the first to link sociological theory to the  study of medicine and health care (he did so with structural functionalism). He was  interested in how various institutions supported the well­functioning of society and  suggested that medicine is one such institution.  The major critique of SF is that it tends  to frame anything that persists in society as being beneficial to society (serving some  purpose that promotes equilibrium). Parsons thought sickness was a form of deviance and  that the medical profession helps manage it and get people out of the “sick role” and into  their “normal” roles and responsibilities.   The political economy perspective grew out of the Marxism (it is associated with a  collection of refinements to Marxism… such neo­marxism, conflict theory*, and  bourdeau’s theory of habitus). Traditional Marxist theory characterizes the world as being  divided between capitalists (the owners of the means of production) and labourers. All  other aspects of society are thought to be shaped by this organizing force (workers  needing to sell labour power to earn a wage to buy goods to sustain themselves).   The political economy perspective sees the world as more complex and consisting of  different interest groups (but it grew of out Marxist theory).  PE researchers are interested  in the stratification of health (unequal access to health sustaining resources) as well as  class alliances and profit motives in medical practice.  PE is not purely a medical  sociology perspective, but it is one of the more current and complex renderings of  stratification that is popular in medical sociology. PE theorists would not argue that  capitalists oppress the working population all the time and in every way possible, but  they are highly critical of the observation that the medical profession is powerful, tends to  have upper class members, and it more willing to engage in expensive research and  treatments than to look at changing social structures that contribute to ill health. For  example, governments subsidize corn production, which results in corn going into all  sorts goods, many of which are unhealthy (e.g. high fructose corn syrup). Some PE  researchers argue that physicians should be quick to point such problems and encourage  governments to invest in more preventati
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 225

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit