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Lecture 32

BIOLOGY 1M03 Lecture 32: 32- Disturbances and Island Theory
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Department
Biology
Course
BIOLOGY 1M03
Professor
Ben Evans
Semester
Winter

Description
Bio 1M03 March 24, 2016 Disturbances and Island Theory Disturbances - Can be human generated or natural - Lighting - Hurricanes - Flooding - Earthquakes - Oil spills - Deforestation Sousa - Studying the intermediate disturbance hypothesis - In the marine zone - Marine intertidal sessile plants and animals - When there is an intermediate level of disturbance you get the highest level of biodiversity (not too low, not too high) - Small rocks represent frequent disturbance, they roll around and crush and kill many organisms - The larger rocks are more stable, and move around less causing less of a disturbance - Have infrequent, intermediate or infrequent disturbances - The intermediate is the largest because it causes both competition and regulation of species - In the high frequency it kills more species and in the high frequency it is not killing that many making it more competitive and the large one doesn’t roll as much and kill that many Succession - The first thing that comes in are the grass and the weeds - The ones that come first are the pioneering species - After the pioneering species comes the early successional species - After that is the mid-successional community (shrubs and short-lived trees begin to invade) - Climax community (long lived trees and mature species) - Occurs after a disturbance - If you start off with no plants, just rock is primary succession - Early succession is when soil is present Climax Community - Endpoint of the successional sequence - Relatively stable stage - Many people have problems as communities are not protected and there is the option for future disturbances - Not supported in communities today - Depends on the frequency and the scale as to what level it will return to after a disaster - Disturbances occur routinely - Mature communities are dynamic and always changing - Concept of climax communities is now considered to be flawed and over simplistic Island Biogeography Theory (IBT) -
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