Class Notes (836,621)
Canada (509,866)
Biology (2,437)
Ben Bolker (16)
Lecture

Exploitation.docx

11 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOLOGY 3SS3
Professor
Ben Bolker
Semester
Winter

Description
March 27 , 2014 Biology 3SS3: Population Ecology Exploitation Introduction ­ Exploitation is when interactions between two speices are good for one species  and bad for other ­ Typically, the exploiter (natural enemy) is taking resources from the other species  (victim) ­ Exploitation is widespread and highly diverse Examples ­ Antelopes graze on trees ­ Lions eat antelopes ­ Ticks feed on ,lions ­ Swallows eat ticks ­ Bacteria reproduce inside the swallow ­ Viruses infect the bacteria ­ Recycling via donor­controlled consumption Types of Exploitation ­ Not used precisely, and not testable ­ Predators kill and eat prey ­ Parasites lives on or in hosts (symbiosis) and use host resources ­ Pathogens cause disease ­ Parasitoids develop inside a host and kill it ­ Grazers take resources form another organism but don’t kill it Symbiotic Kills host Predator No Yes Grazer No No Parasite Yes No Parasitoid Yes yes Borderline Cases ­ Do rabbits predate small plants, or graze them? ­ Are small insects on large plants grazers, or parasites? ­ Do intestinal worms in healthy people count as pathogens? ­ Anthrax is usually called a parasite (or pathogen), but should probably really be a  parasitoid ­ Mosquitoes  More Vocabulary ­ Interactions can be grouped by the taxonomy of the interacting species ­ Herbivores eat plants ­ Carnivores eat animals ­ Micro­organisms are more likely to be called parasites ­ Insects living on animals are more likely to be called parasites than insects living  on plants Exploiters and Resources ­ When we talk about exploitation in general, we will al the exploitee the resource  species ­ Resource species are a lot like abiotic resources (e.g. water, light and nitrogen) ­ Both benefit the species that use them ­ Both may, or may not, be depleted significantly by the exploiter ­ Name an important difference between biotic and abiotic resources • Abiotic resources don’t typically increase exponentially when rare • Abiotic resources don’t defend themselves/coevolve Balance and Equilibrium ­ In an exploiter­resource system, each species has an indirect, negative effect on  itself ­ As resource species population grows, the number of exploiters should increase,  which is bad for the resource species ­ As exploiter population grows, the population of the resource species should  decrease, which is bad for the exploiter ­ Since each species has a negative effect on itself, these systems tend to reach  equilibrium ­ We may reach equilibrium or cycle around it (overshoot) ­ Negative feedback between predators and prey March 28 , 2014 Equilibrium Questions ­ What factors determine the equilibrium levels of a resource­exploiter system? ­ What factors determine whether neither, one or both species survive? ­ What happens if people perturb the system (e.g. by eating a lot of one or the other  species)? ­ The equilibrium is useful if it is not reached: if there are cycles, the equilibrium is  what the system cycles around Reciprocal Control ­ Exploiter and resource species whose population densities are mostly regulated by  each other ­ Per capita growth rate of exploiter depends mostly on resource density ­ Per capita growth rate of resource depends mostly on exploiter density ­ What determines equilibrium values? • For equilibrium each species must be at the density required to keep  the other species balanced Tendency to Oscillate ­ In an exploiter resource system, each species has an indirect negative effect on  itself ­ Effect is time­delayed: each species takes time to respond to the other ­ This means these systems have a tendency to oscillate ­ The same idea s from our population models, but with an explicit mechanism for  delay ­ There is a simple intuition for how these systems oscillate: exploiter goes up,  resource goes down, exploiter goes down, resource foes up, exploiter goes up Persistence of Oscillations ­ Resource­exploiter systems tend to oscillate ­ In the simplest models,  oscillations are neutral ­ In more realist models, large oscillations will tend to get smaller ­ If small oscillations also tend to get smaller, the oscillations are damped ­ If small oscillations tend to get larger, the system approaches a limit cycle Damped Oscillations Neutral Oscillations ­ Depends on where you start ­ Don’t come back or diverge Limit Cycles Models ­ We can investigate exploiter­host systems using simple models ­ Resource­species growth rate may depend on density of exploiter, or resource  species, or both ­ We will use P (predator) and V (victim)(E and R are too confusing): dV/dt =  rv(V,P)V ­ Exploiter growth rate may depend on density of exploiter, or resource species or  both: dP/dt = r pV,P)P ­ At equilibrium: • rp = rV = 0 (both species present) • rV = P = 0 (resource present, exploiter absent) • P = V = 0 (empty habitat) ­ Can’t have exploiter without resource Interactions ­ What makes this a resource­exploiter system? ­ dV/dt = r (V,P)V v ­ dP/dt = r pV,P)P ­ What should happen to r  aspV increases? • The resource species should be good for the exploiter • r  increases when V goes up p • The exploiter should be bad for the resource species • R Vgoes down as P goes up Simplest model ­ The simplest model of resource­exploiter interaction is that their per capita  growth rates only respond to each other ­ dV/dt = rv(P)V ­ dP/dt = rp(V)R ­ A pure reciprocal control mode: resource growth rate depends only on exploiter  density and vice versa The Ratios ­ This model assumes: • The rate at which individual fish get eaten depends on the total number of  sharks • The rate at which individual sharks eat fish depend on the total number of  fish • The ratio of sharks to fish does not matter directly • Does this make sense? What happens in the model if there are too many  sharks?  The number of fish will of down  Then the number of sharks will go down  Then the number of fish will go up Resource Populations ­ Why might the resource population affect per capita growth rate of the resource  species? • Competition for resources, territory, mates • Co­operation for protection, food­gathering (Allee effect) • Safety in numbers (predator satiation) Exploiter Populations ­ Why might the exploiter population affect per capita growth ate of the exploiter  species? • Cimpetition for resources, territory, mates • Co­operation for protection, food­gathering  Resources Density­Dependence ­ The most unrealistic aspect of the current model is that in the absence of the  exploiter, the resource species increases without limit ­ In reality, we would expect it, eventually, to be regulated ­ We can change our equation to allow the resource species to have a (negative)  effect on itself: • dV/dt = rv(P,V)V • dP/dt = rp(V)P ­ Exploiter per capita growth still depends only on resource Predator Satiation ­ Another conceptual problem with this model is the idea that exploiter feeding is  proportional to size of the resource population ­ If we have ten times as many fish, sharks will eat ten times as fast; maybe they  just 
More Less

Related notes for BIOLOGY 3SS3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit