Document Summary

Individuals do no evolve; populations do: a population is a group of individuals of a single species that live and interbreed in a particular geographic area at the same time. Most populations are genetically variable: nearly all populations have genetic variation for many characters. Evolutionary change can be measure by allele and genotype frequencies: allele frequencies are usually estimated in locally interbreeding groups, Mendelian populations, within a geographic population of a species: allele frequency = p = (number of copies of the allele in the pop. The genetic structure of a population does not change over time if certain conditions exist. Deviations from hardy-weinberg equilibrium show that evolution is occurring: the patterns of deviation from hardy-weinberg equilibrium can help us identify specific mechanisms of evolutionary change. Gene flow may change allele frequencies: migration of individuals and movements of gametes between populations, gene flow, are common. Does change allele frequencies and often results in adaptations.

Get access

Grade+20% off
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers
Class+
$8 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Class+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
30 Verified Answers

Related Documents

Related Questions