Class Notes (836,844)
Canada (509,924)
Economics (1,617)
ECON 1B03 (523)
Lecture

Chapters 6, 8.docx

13 Pages
36 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1B03
Professor
Hannah Holmes
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapters 6, 8: Supply, Demand & Government Policies  • Recall: In a free, unregulated market system, market forces establish equilibrium  prices and exchange quantities  • While equilibrium conditions may be efficient, it may be the case that not  everyone in society is satisfies and the government may want to get involved  Price Controls  • Are usually enacted when policymakers believe the market price is unfair to  buyers or sellers  • The government will freeze prices at a predetermined level that they feel will  make members of society better off  • Price ceiling & price floors Price Ceilings • Price Ceiling: a legal maximum on the price at which a good can be sold  • The price ceiling is binding (effective) if set below equilibrium price, leading to a  shortage  • The price ceiling is not binding (not effective) if it is set above equilibrium price • Example: Rent Control • The government’s goal: to help the poor by making housing more affordable • It sets a maximum price (rent) for housing that is below equilibrium price  • In the SR (short run), the number of apartments is fixed, so Supply of housing is  inelastic  • Potential renters may not be highly responsive to rents because they take time to  adjust their housing arrangements (e.g. give notice to current landlord), so  Demand for housing in the SR is relatively inelastic  • Rent Control in the SR • In the LR (long run), low rents can mean that landlords may convert to condos,  get out of the rental business and/or won’t maintain existing apartments, so  Supply is elastic  • Low rents encourage people to look for housing (move out from your parents if  the price is right), so Demand is elastic  • Rent Control in the LR  • In the LR, the housing shortage is large • Where rent controls exist, landlords must resort to non­price rationing of housing: ­ Can keep long waiting lists ­ Can discriminate (no kids, no pets, no students) ­ Some take bribes (key money) ­ Some may get out of the rental market altogether  Numerical Example • The equations for demand and supply for 1­bedroom apartments in Glanbrook  are: Qd = 1700 – 2P Qs = 2P – 900  • What is equilibrium rental price and apartments rented? In equilibrium, Qd = Qs 1700 – 2P   = 2P – 900   4P   = 2600      P   = 650  Sub P = 650 into either Qd or Qs  Qd = 1700 – 2(650)         = 400 = Qs eqm quantity  • What if the province imposes a rent ceiling of $500? If P = 500, Qd = 1700 – 2(500) = 700  Qs = 2(500) – 900 = 100 Shortage = Qd – Qs = 600 apts.  Price Ceilings Can Lead to:  • Shortages that worsen over time • Inefficient allocation to consumers  ­ People who really want the good may not get to buy it  • Wasted resources  ­ Spend a lot of time trying to find an apartment… • Inefficiently low quality  ­ No incentive for landlords to keep up apartments if they have to rent them  cheaply  Black Markets • Example: “I’ll rent you an apartment if you slip me an extra $500 a month under  the table” • Illegal, but they often occur • At Q ceiling, consumers would be willing to pay up to the black market price for  housing  • The landlord would legally claim rent = rent ceiling and charge the renter the  different under the table  Price Floors •  Price Flo : a legal minimum on the price at which a good can be sold  • The price floor is binding if set above the equilibrium price, leading to surplus  • The price floor is not binding if set below the equilibrium price  • Example: Agricultural Price Floors • The government wants to ensure that wheat farmers receive a “fair” price so that  they remain profitable and keep growing wheat  Numerical Example • The equations for demand and supply in the apple market are:  Qd = 22 – 2P  Qs = 3P – 18  Q is measured in 1000’s of bushels. • What is equilibrium price and quantity? In eqm, Qd = Qs        22 – 2P = 3P – 18     40 = 5P        P = 8  Qd = 22 – 2(8) = 6 (thousand bushels) • What if the government imposes a minimum price of $10 per bushel? If P = 10, Qd = 22 – 2(10)             = 2 (thousand)      Qs = 3(10) – 18             = 12 (thousand)  Surplus of 12000 – 2000 = 10 000 bushels  Price Floors Can Lead to:  • Surplus production:  ­ Producers will want to supply more at the higher price ­ Surplus may be stored, destroyed, exported, given away  ­ Can’t sell surpluses on the domestic market  • Inefficient allocation of sales: ­ The lowest price sellers aren’t always the ones who get to sell the good (have  the lowest cost) • Wasted resources: ­ Spend a lot of time trying to sell to a smaller number of consumers  • Inefficiently high quality: ­ Fancy packaging, added bells + whistles that consumers may not care about  • Illegal activities:  ­ Sellers trying to sell goods under the table at lower prices   Taxes • Governments levy taxes to raise revenue for public projects  •  Tax Incidence:  the distribution of a tax burden  • Do the buyers or seller bear the burden when the government imposes a tax? A Tax on Consumers  • Example: The Market for Beer  • P is the price per bottle  • Q is the number of bottle sold per week at a very small bar in a farming  community  • In eqm, P = $3.00 and Q = 100  • Now suppose the government imposes a tax of $0.50 per bottle on consumers of  beer • Consumers will demand less beer • The gov’t doesn’t care what the eqm price is, and the $0.50 tax will apply no  matter what the price of beer happens to be  • Consumers will want less beer at any price • This means the demand curve will shift down by the amount of the tax  • Now there’s a new eqm at P = $2.80 and Q = 90 • But, the consumers must pay the $0.50 tax • They end up paying P = $3.30, while the firm (the bar) receives P = $2.80  • The government receives $0.50 x 90 = $45.00 in tax revenue  • Notice that the burden of tax doesn’t fall equally on consumers and sellers • Before the tax, the consumers paid $3.00
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit