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Lecture

Atlantic Canada


Department
Geography
Course Code
GEOG 2RC3
Professor
Walter Peace

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Atlantic Canada
October 13, 2011
10:52 AM
Introduction:
Recent colonial history (esp. Newfoundland)
Changing "space relations":
19th century -> strange regional economy
20th century -> peripheral position in national economy
-> "supply" region i.e. hinterland/ periphery region
-> Bone (ch.1 ) - downward transitional region
Defining characteristics- orientation to the sea (Livelihood, settlement pattern,
etc.
What happens when this disappears?
Questions: why did Atlantic Canada not remain a "gateway" to Canada (as
compared to the Atlantic Seaboard of the U.S.)? Why did this gateway function
shift to "central" Canada?
Geographically and political fragmentation of this region
<2% of Canada's area (excluding Labrador)
5.4% of Canada's area (including Labrador)
Does Labrador "belong" to this region?
7.2% (2.3 million) of Canada's population (2006)
Share of Canada's GDP 6% (see table 9.1; figure 9.1)
3 CMAs
1996 2001 2006
Halifax 332,000 359,00
0
372858
St. Johns 174,
000
173,00
0
181,113
St. john 125,000 123,00
0
122,389
Population density - 4.9 persons/km
Population growth rate less than national avg. in postwar era, despite high birth
rate- WHY?
High outmigration rate throughout post WWII era, resulting in a high
dependency ration- especially in Newfoundland
The most rural of Canada's regions:
%urban %rural
Nfdl. 57.7 42.3
NS 55.8 44.2
PEI 44.8 55.2
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