Class Notes (859,556)
CA (520,842)
McMaster (40,372)
HLTHAGE (1,610)
HLTHAGE 1AA3 (277)
Lecture

Post War .docx

3 Pages
39 Views

Department
Health, Aging and Society
Course Code
HLTHAGE 1AA3
Professor
Geraldine Voros

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
1945 Post War Proposals for Canada • Ecological and energy crisis on the horizon but these capitalists are beholding to  only a small group of wealthy shareholders, they continue to exploit people,  resources i.e. aquifers, poor environments (people need to earn money) animals  (giant confined Animal Feeding Operations), the environment (they pollute while  producing) = the world is at risk • Conclusion • Hunger, obesity and the earth’s capacity to support us are reasons to look at these  issues very critically, we need to feed all nutritious foods while maintaining the  environment • The 1945 health Insurance Proposals for Post War Canada • Canadian Gov’t’s design for a new post World War Two Canada = Green Book • Central gov’t, and premiers to restructure the tax system, set forth millions of  dollars for new programs, balance federal and provincial relations • New challenges = Social issues of sickness and unemployment • Challenges to meet expectations after 10 years of depression and 6 years of war • The hopes of the nation – balanced between the confidence of a nation that had  managed a remarkable war effort and the fear of a return to difficult depression • Gov’t had clear objectives = support private enterprise to produce employment,  support public enterprise in national development, public investment for  productive employment, social safety net for unemployment, disabilities, sickness  and old age • Health insurance was high on the priority list • Why and how the decisions were made was important regarding health care • 1945 proposals: 4 main stages = 1. Department of Pensions and National Health,  2. Special Committee on Social Security, 3. Committee on Dominion and  Provincial Relations, 4. Dominion – Provincial Conference • Why the decision = Elizabeth Poor Laws necessitated care of the vulnerable while  “relief” helped to support the needy • and now there was a need to look after all = medical profession bore the brunt of  providing medical care and faced unpaid bills • Saskatchewan one of the worst provinces for this and so the Sask. Med.  Association was happy to receive a monthly grant from their provincial gov’t and  in favor of endorsing a health insurance policy • Health care was declared an essential service to survival as was food, clothing and  shelter • Sickness survey of 1950­51 said Canadians were not healthy • Evidence = Canada ranks 17th amongst developed nations in 1937, high infant  mortality rate in 1940 (38 per 1000 live births) due to births outside of hospitals,  maternal mortality considered high in 1940 (4 per 1000 births), deaths from  communicable disease i.e. tuberculosis, influenza, whooping cough, typhoid,  diphtheria, measles, control of venereal disease is backward in Canada, mental  disease in Canada is grave, young children’s deaths under one year of age high,  Rural people more ill • CMA summary – 1934 adequate medical care not provided, cost and loss due to  illness overwhelming, preventable disease and postponable deaths common, few  physicians have time to practice preventative medicine and not remunerated  adequately • Sask., Manitoba and Alberta = doctors work for a basic fee1932 B.C. health 
More Less
Unlock Document
Subscribers Only

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
Subscribers Only
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document
Subscribers Only

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit