Class Notes (839,113)
Canada (511,191)
Brock University (12,137)
Lecture 7

Lecture 7 (September 26).docx

6 Pages
44 Views

Department
Health, Aging and Society
Course Code
HLTHAGE 1BB3
Professor
Jessica Gish

This preview shows pages 1 and half of page 2. Sign up to view the full 6 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 7 (Thursday, September 26, 2013) – Population Aging Speed of Population Aging: Years For Population Aged 65+ To Double From 7% to 14% 1. Developed countries ­ France (1865­1980): 115 ­ Sweden (1890­1975): 85 ­ Canada (1944­2009): 65 ­ What challenges do you think the compression of population aging presents for countries? ­ It’s taken about 100 years ­ Rising cost for health care services  ­ Concerns about jobs  2. Developing countries ­ China (2000­2026): 26 ­ One child per family policy contributes to this  ­ Brazil (2011­32): 21 ­ Singapore (2000­2019): 19 ­ What theoretical concept did Riley coin to describe this issue? ­ Taking less time than developed countries  Structural lag = people change quickly, their needs and desires can change faster than local structures Table: Life Expectancy at Birth and Age 65 Years, Males and Females th ­ Life expectancy has increased throughout the 20  century ­ Table points out when this exactly happened  ­ There was a 10 year increase for males and there was an even higher increase for women  ­ The gain for that period was lower for those who were older  ­ If you were a person born in the early 20s, nothing was benefitting you from living longer  ­ It was younger people that were benefiting Life Span ­ There is a difference between life spans and life expectancy 1 Lecture 7 (Thursday, September 26, 2013) – Population Aging Life span = theoretical expectancy an animal/human can live (finite/fixed number) ­ What we know from data is that the finite/fixed number is 120 years of age  ­ Oldest reported/confirmed human being was 122 years ­ Life span differs for different species  Measuring Population Aging ­ Median age of population ­ Percentage of the population aged 65+ ­ Population pyramids ­ Dependency ratios Median Age ­ Age at which half the population is old and half the population is young ­ Median age > 30  ▯old population ­ Median age 
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1 and half of page 2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit