Class Notes (838,955)
Canada (511,160)
Brock University (12,137)
Lecture 11

Lecture 11 (October 16).docx

7 Pages
64 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health, Aging and Society
Course
HLTHAGE 1BB3
Professor
Jessica Gish
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 11 (Wednesday, October 16, 2013) – Personal Health, Illness & Life Extension/Aging &  Health/Long­Term/Community Care Health as a Social Process ­ Agency ­ Personal history ­ Social structural conditions Determinants of Health ­ Refers to any prerequisite to health or any characteristic that brings about change in a health condition ­ Income, education, and social status ­ Employment ­ Social environments, including communities and families ­ Physical environments, including housing and working conditions ­ Healthy child development ­ Personal health practices and coping skills ­ Health services ­ Social support networks ­ Biology and genetics ­ Gender  ­ Culture Education and Chronic Pain ­ Community health survey ­ Based on your level of education ­ People you have less than secondary – report less 23% ­ Secondary, graduation and more – reported more ­ Education you have has an impact on whether the person will report likely ­ These people were older than 65 Gender Differences in Health 1 Lecture 11 (Wednesday, October 16, 2013) – Personal Health, Illness & Life Extension/Aging &  Health/Long­Term/Community Care ­ Gender role socialization and health behaviours ­ Convergence of health behaviours? ­ Major determinants of health by gender ­ Women – social structural factors ­ Men – personal health practices ­ Women will be more likely to go and see a doctor and seek assistance than men  ­ Gerontologists are thinking about how gender will affect health in the future ­ Some argue that social structural factors will women will explain whether women are healthy and  what types of activities/employments status they engage in later in life Compression of Morbidity Hypothesis ­ Human life span is not increasing ­ Life expectancy is not increasing to the natural limit ­ Prevention of premature death will allow death to occur closer to the natural limit ­ Ideal goal is to postpone or compress the onset of chronic disability ­ People are prematurely dying and he wants people to not be dying at a premature age  ­ He wants people to be dying quickly without experiencing too many problems in the last few years  (less chronic illnesses) th ­ 1901  ▯what happened in the early part of the 20  century, people died early after a long period of  morbidity (lots of illness, death was long and gradual) ­ 1980  ▯people are dying with a lower period of morbidity ­ Ideal  ▯dying with the least period of morbidity as possible Limitations of the Compression of Morbidity Thesis ­ Supported somewhat by empirical research ­ Considered to be too optimistic for three reasons 1. The major causes of chronic illnesses are not necessarily the major causes of death (i.e. arthritis) 2. Many chronic conditions such as heart disease which cause death often involve minimal disability 3. As life expectancy increases, the duration of chronic disease can only increase 2 Lecture 11 (Wednesday, October 16, 2013) – Personal Health, Illness & Life Extension/Aging &  Health/Long­Term/Community Care Disability­Free Life Expectancy: The Concept ­ Refers to the number of years of life remaining that are free of any disability ­ Sometimes called active life expectancy ­ Considers the intersection of longevity and morbidity on quality of life ­ Assesses a person’s physical and mental capacities to complete activities and instrumental activities of  daily living  Disability­Free Life Expectancy: The Data (2001) 1. Sierra Leone ­ What is interesting compared to Canada is that is shows how health is something that is social ­ Average life expectancy = 56.5 ­ Disability­free life expectancy = 28 ­ 28.5 years with mental/physical disability before death 2. Canada  ­ Average life expectancy = 80 years ­ Disability free­life expectancy = 69 years ­ 11 years with disability  3. Richmond, BC ­ Average life expectancy = 81.2 years ­ Disability­free life expectancy = 72.8 years ­ 8.4 years 4. Nunavik region of QC ­ Average life expectancy = 65.4 years ­ Disability­free life expectancy = 61 years ­ 4.4 years with disability Successful Aging and Life Course Theory LCT = early life circumstances affect later life conditions 3 Lecture 11 (Wednesday, October 16, 2013) – Personal Health, Illness & Life Extension/Aging &  Health/Long­Term/Community Care ­ Evidence ­ Mothers who experience famine while pregnant have children who report ill health 50 years later ­ A low birth weight infant increases the risk for obesity in adulthood which increases the risk for  diabetes ­ People from poor families are more likely to engage in health­damaging behaviours such as smoking,  drinking, drug abuse, and lack of exercise Example  ▯children in poor families are socialized into these habits ­ Economic hardship in childhood can increase the chance of heart disease in later life  Aging & Health/Long­Term/Community Care Focus Questions ­ What i
More Less

Related notes for HLTHAGE 1BB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit