Class Notes (838,058)
Canada (510,633)
Brock University (12,132)
Lecture 16

Lecture 16 (November 6).docx

5 Pages
39 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health, Aging and Society
Course
HLTHAGE 1BB3
Professor
Jessica Gish
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 16 (Wednesday, November 16, 2013) – Aging in the Family Multi­Generational Living Arrangement ­ 13% of Canada’s elderly population lives in some kind of multi­generational living arrangement  ­ There is a high­quality bond across generations with proper living arrangements  Intergenerational Relations in the Aging Family ­ Generation refers to a position of ranked descent in a family lineage ­ A generational position within a family is defined by the roles of children, parent, and grandparent  and denotes the potential number of intergenerational relationships  Socio­Cultural Changes: Implications for Intergenerational Relations and Social Support for New  Cohorts of Older Adults ­ What social and cultural changes do you think are increasing the complexity of family configurations,  intergenerational relationships, and the availability of social support in later life? ­ Men and women are spending less time in their spousal role  ­ It is just more expensive to live and there is a high unemployment rate ­ Older adults have more resources available to them than younger adults  ­ In 2006, 49% of younger adults (20­29) lived with their parents ­ Most young adults are unable to support themselves ­ Crowded nest  ▯living with parents while studying and commuting  ­ People are moving out west because there are more opportunities available ­ These generations then aren’t living in close proximity, which can be difficult for social support  Intergenerational Relations: Impact on Roles ­ Grandparenthood ­ Latent kin matrix ­ Role of the kinkeeper Role of the Grandparent ­ It is more likely that a 20 year­old alive today has a grandmother still living (91%) than a 20 year­old  alive in 1900 had his or her mother living (83%) (Putney & Bengston, 2005) 1 Lecture 16 (Wednesday, November 16, 2013) – Aging in the Family ­ At birth, about two­thirds of children have four living grandparents (including step­grandparents), and  by 30 years of age, approximately 75% still have at least one grandparent (Connidis, 2010) ­ What resources or forms of social support do grandparents offer? Latent­Kin Matrix ­ Refers to the number of family members or kin resources available to provide support to family  members in times of need ­ When there is more complexity, there is a more latent­kin matrix ­ Kin resources are now available across generations  ­ Consequences 1. More kin and combinations of kin resources available to provide help and support 2. Types of caring relationships? Role of the Kin­Keeper ­ Refers to the person who maintains intergenerational bonds by communicating with family members  of different generations  Defining the “Modern Family” ­ Focus on family ties rather than co­residence ­ Consider the family as a “fluid” set of relations that ebbs and flows over time within and across  generations ­ As the family unit ages it moves through time ­ Family unit obtains new members ­ Overlapping roles  Common Myths About the Family 1. Golden past ­ Family life was better in the past is the myth  ­ At th
More Less

Related notes for HLTHAGE 1BB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit