Class Notes (834,376)
Canada (508,507)
Lecture

Central Nervous System Infections

15 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health Sciences
Course
HTHSCI 2RR3
Professor
Jennifer Ostovich
Semester
Winter

Description
Central Nervous System Infections STUDY TIPS • For each type of infection, try and answer the following questions • What is the syndrome? • How does it manifest? • How do we make the diagnosis? • Which microorganisms are responsible? • Who is vulnerable to these type of infections and why? • How do we treat the patient? • Which infection control precautions are associated with the disease? CNS INFECTIONS ­ OBJECTIVES • Briefly review the anatomy of the Central Nervous System (CNS) and its defenses • Discuss common types of CNS infections and the clinical syndromes they  produce o Meningitis o (Viral) Encephalitis o Brain Abscess CNS INFECTIONS – ANATOMY CNS INFECTIONS ­ DEFENSES • Blood­Brain Barrier (BBB) o Capillaries limit access to cerebral spinal fluid & brain tissue o Benefit: Limits toxin & pathogen access o Challenge: Pharmacotherapy CNS INFECTIONS – RISK FACTORS • Host Factors o Absence of normal flora o Paucity of local macrophages, antibodies, complement proteins o Inflammation   Increases permeability of the blood­brain barrier; pathogen entry  Increases BBB permeability to antibiotic therapy and immune cells • Portals of Infection o Trauma to bones and meninges, medical procedures  o Peripheral neurons o Respiratory system o Gastrointestinal system CNS INFECTIONS ­ MENINGITIS • Inflammation of the meninges o Infectious and non­infectious causes o Acute Meningitis  Infection  Symptom duration of less than 2 weeks  Patients are seriously ill  MEDICAL EMERGENCY o Chronic Meningitis  Symptom duration of more than 2 weeks  Variable severity of symptoms  Most commonly reported in immunocompromised patients, or  associated with a reaction to drugs • Pathophysiology of Clinical Findings in Meningitis  o Systemic Infection  Fever  Myalgia  Rash o Meningeal Inflammation  Neck stiffness  Brudzinski’s sign  Kernig’s Sign  Jolt Accentuation of headache o Cerebral Vasculitis  Seizures o Elevated Intracranial Pressure  Changes in mental status  Headache  Cranial Nerve Palsies  Seizures • Diagnosis  o Patient history   Not sufficient to determine diagnosis of meningitis o Signs & Symptoms  Neck pain, headache, N&V, photophobia, fever, rash, altered  mental state  Sensitivities (% of people with meningitis correctly diagnosed by a  positive test result) • Neck Pain – 28% • Headache – 50% • Nausea – 32% o Physical exam o CSF analysis • Signs & Symptoms o Classic clinical triad of meningitis  Fever  Neck Stiffness  Altered Mental State (confusion, amnesia, loss of  alertness/orientation)   Triad present in 44% of patients with meningitis  Absence of all three rules out meningitis with 99% certainty o 95% of patients have 2 out of the 4 symptoms  Headache  Fever  Neck stiffness  Altered mental state PHYSICAL EXAM ­ NECK STIFFNESS    HYSICAL EXAM ­ BRUDZINSKI  ’   S SIG  • First described by Josef Brudzinski in 1909 • Passive neck flexion in supine position leads to flexion of knees and hips  PHYSICAL EXAM ­ KERNIG  ’   S SIGN  • Described by Vladamir Kernig in 1884 • Extension of knee with patient supine and hip flexed at 90 degrees results in  resistance or pain in lower back or posterior thigh PHYSICAL EXAM ­ JOLT ACCENTUATION • Positive Sign o Accentuation of headache with active horizontal head turning at a  frequency of 2 to 3 turns per second o Sensitivity: 97%  Sensitivity: % of people with the disease who are correctly  diagnosed by a positive test result o Specificity: 60%   Specificity: % of people free of the disease who are correctly  identified by a negative test result o In patients with fever and headache, absence of jolt accentuation rules out  the probability of meningitis MENINGITIS ­ CSF ANALYSIS  • Bacterial Meningitis o Low CSF glucose levels ( 0.45 g/L) o  CSF WBC > 1000    Mostly neutrophils o  Gram stain o  Culture • Viral Meningitis o  Normal CSF glucose levels o  Normal to high CSF protein levels o  CSF WBC – mildly elevated   Mainly lymphocytes and monocytes MENINGITIS ­ PATHOGENS • Bacteria o Streptococcus pneumoniae o Neisseria meningitidis o Listeria monocytogenes o Haemophilus influenzae o Group B Streptococci • Viruses o Enteroviruses (Coxsackie B) o Herpes Simplex Virus • Fungi o Cryptococcus neoformans STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE • Pneumococcal meningitis  • Causative organism of meningitis in all age groups o Responsible for ~ 50% of all cases of bacterial meningitis  o 75% of adults are colonized with S. pneumoniae • Bacteremia associated with pneumonia in most cases  • Transmitted by respiratory droplets o Infectious period: 1 to 3 days prior to the onset of clinical symptoms until  pathogen is no longer present in nasal and oral discharge • Case fatality rate of approximately 26% • 30% of survivors left with long­term neurologic sequelae (e.g. hearing loss) • Public heath implications o All cases of pneumococcal meningitis must be reported to public health o No droplet precautions necessary – routine precautions only o No chemoprophylaxis for close contacts o Immunizations  Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (Pneu­C­, Prevnar) in children  less than 2 years of age  Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Pneu­P­23, Pneumovax) in  individuals ≥ 65 years of age, at increased risk of complications  from pneumococcal pneumonia o 35% resistant to β­lactam antibiotics NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS 1. Evasion (fimbriae) & Penetration (invasins) 2. Evasion of host defenses & Tissue damage 3. Meningitis a. Subarachnoid Inflammation b. Cerebral vasculitis c. Increased BBB permeability • Meningococcal meningitis o Disproportionately affects children and young adults  Responsible for ~ 25% of all cases of bacterial meningitis  Serogroups A, B, C, Y and W­135 in North America o Endotoxin production  Chills, fever, weakness, generalized aches  Petechial rash ­ Activation of blood clotting proteins  Endotoxic shock & disseminated intravascular coagulation o Infectious period  7 days prior to the onset of clinical symptoms until pathogen no  longer present in nasal and oral discharge o Case fatality rate of 3­13%  15% of survivors left with long­term neurologic sequelaue  • Scattered petechial lesions commonly associated with acute meningococcemia • Public health implications o All cases must be reported to public health o Transmission via respiratory droplets o All suspected or possible cases of meningococcal meningitis should be  placed in respiratory isolation for the first 24 hours starting after the  administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy o Close Contacts include:   Household, child care facility, nursery school contacts   Individuals who have been in contact with the patient’s oral  secretions within 7 days of disease onset  Individuals who have frequently ate or slept in the same dwelling  as the infected individual within 7 days of disease onset o Vaccination recommended to control outbreaks, for patients with increased  susceptibility to meningococcal disease, and for travelers  Menomune – serogroup A, C, Y, W­135 (2 years and older)  Menjugate – serogroup C only (2 months of age and older)  No coverage for serogroup B
More Less

Related notes for HTHSCI 2RR3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit