Class Notes (836,610)
Canada (509,865)
Linguistics (354)
Lecture 10

LINGUIST 2S03 Lecture 10: LING2S03 - LECTURE 10: MULTIPLE CODES
Premium

12 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Linguistics
Course
LINGUIST 2S03
Professor
Nikolai Penner
Semester
Winter

Description
  SOCIOLINGUISTICS LING 2S03  WINTER SEMESTER 2017  INSTRUCTOR: DR. NIKOLAI PENNER    MULTIPLE CODES IN A SOCIETY  INTRODUCTION   ● One state, one nation, one language   ● Monolingual countries? *European nationalist*   ex) Germany: foreign Ls (Turkish), other indigenous Ls (Sorbian)   - Sorbian = Slavic people, born German but speak Sorbian  TOWEL OF FABEL  ● Everyone spoke ONE/the same language [biblical]   ● People started to communicate in different languages → couldn’t build the tower to  be all as God  TERMINOLOGY   BILINGUALISM  → common human condition; makes it possible to function to some extent in more than  one language   - Speaks more than one language → written + spoken  ● How do people become bilingual?  1. Grow up learning 2 languages at the same time  2. Learning a 2nd language (after acquiring L1)     0        MULTILINGUALISM  → perfect in both languages, native in more than 3 languages  - Unique ability   - Balanced bilingual → minority   SELECTING A CODE   ● Code -- any language/variety of a language   - Why code? No judgements, no emotional connotation  ● Choosing an appropriate code   - No monolingual speakers; change + adapt code due to style + register   ● Encoded social meanings   ● Language choices = part of social identity   - Prescribed within a society  - Shift dimensions   - Express our thoughts; socially acceptable  MULTILINGUALISM  → unique conditions, balanced bilingual  ex) Montreal -- French & English  - Would have a dominant language though**   ● Equal abilities in multiple languages are exceptional  ● Varying degrees of command of the different languages are typical = Native like?  Near-native like?  ● Difference in competence   - Mono = only able to know one language / abnormal to only know 1 language   MULTILINGUAL SOCIETIES  ● Context determine language choice  ● To be socially competent:     1        1. Who uses what?  2. When?  3. For what purpose?  - Social identity   Q: if you speak English + local dialect; are you bilingual or bidialectal? → depends on  prestige, social, etc.  DOMAINS OF USE   ● Certain social factors are important in accounting for language choice  ● ‘Typical’ interactions  ● Domains (Joshua Fishman) [5]  1. Home  2. Education  3. Employment   4. Religion  5. Friendship  [HEERF]   GUARANÍ (PARAGUAY)   ● 2 official languages  - Spanish (colonizers) → religion, education, administration settings  - Guaraní (local American Indian language) → family, friendship, education  (primary)  - Proficient in both languages  - Bilingual situation  - Rural = mono speakers  - Urban = bilingual   Q: what happens linguistically with close contact language? → influence of each other       2        EFFECTS OF BILINGUALISM  ● Lead to:  1. Loss = where there is 1 majority language   2. Diffusion = certain features may spread to the other language (ex. Pronunciation,  syntax)  ex) the Balkans, Sri Lanka, Southern India  ● The village of Kupwar  - 3, 000 in Maharashtra   ● 4 languages are spoken:  1. Marathi & Urdu = Indo-European [low variety] (Muslims spoke Urdu)   2. Kannada = high [not Indo]  3. Telugu   - Trilingualism = norm (normal)***   ● Distribution by caste  ● Consequence: convergence of the varieties   ● Lexicon distinguishes the groups  CLASSICAL DIGLOSSIA  ● Charles Ferguson, original definition:   1. 2 varieties of the same language in the community, HIGH (h) & (l)   2. Distinct functions   3. No (H) in everyday communication  - Narrow definition = rigid & classical   CHARACTERISTICS OF DIGLOSSIA  1. Persistency (very stable for centuries)   2. Functional distribution  3. Prestige   -  Cannot change language of Holy text    3        ex) High German Bible - God only spoke in German, why speak another language? Must  pray in German, etc.  4. Literary heritage  5. All members of a community learn L   ex) Haiti   - Every can speak French Creole, but NOT STANDARD FRENCH   - Some members might not learn the high variety = then no access to education,  limits  ● High = taught through the school system  ● Low = lacks standardized texts   EXTENDED DIGLOSSIA  ● Narrow diglossia = L is related to H  ● Do H & L have to be related?  ● Fishman’s extension (developed after the classical diglossia)  - Paraguay, Spanish = H, Guarani = L = languages are NOT RELATED   DIGLOSSIA & SOCIAL DISTINCTION  ● Diglossia reinforces social distinction   - Excluding participation in society  ex) Haiti = women excluded to exercise their full potential = no access to high language  (Standard French)   FUNCTIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF H & L   ● Using the right variety in the proper situation  - We know when to speak what   ex) an outsider speaking fluent L in formal situations    4        - Not socially acceptable   JEOFFREY CHAUCER (1343-1400)  ● Wrote tales  ● Writing revolutionary b/c wrote in English meanwhile French was the high variety   - English = language of the peasants  CONTACT BETWEEN H & L   ● H lexical items in L   ● Result = admixture of H vocab in L   ● Doublets   ex) England (11-14th century)   - Farmers = raised the meat  - Nobility ate the meat   - English changed meats (similar to French) origin of meat = French  - Meat related to animal  TERMINOLOGY I   ● Code-switching -- using more than 1 code = very common access to more than 1  code → social norm; one code @ the same time, despite rules  - Inter-sentential = caused boundaries)   ex) sentence 1 would be in English, then sentence 2 would be in another language  ● Code-mixing   - Intra-sentential   TERMINOLOGY II   ● Code switching = situational + metaphorical  ● Situational (transactional) = code choice depends on...    5        - Participants  - Setting   ex) Norway = 2 varieties  - Bokmal = high variety + Ranamal = low variety (informal situations  - Topic of situation = changes social roles (official settings)  - Personal to formal 
More Less

Related notes for LINGUIST 2S03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit