Class Notes (835,117)
Canada (508,937)
LABRST 1C03 (126)
Lecture

Labour and Globalization

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Department
Labour Studies
Course
LABRST 1C03
Professor
David Goutor
Semester
Winter

Description
Labour & Globalization th February 6 , 2014 Canada in a Global Context - Immigration rates effect things like property value, and the construction sector - Population growth (Vancouver, Alberta, Montreal) - Luck: Canada had bad luck with free trade agreement before 1990 recession, 12.5% unemployment rate in large cities • Canada benefitted in the recovery later • Not currency, but deficit panic - Stephen Harper: He took power at a peculiar moment, crisis in 2007/2008, he is able to take credit for a lot of things • Harper hated the cautious business culture but that’s what saved Canada in the recession, then he takes credit for this Manufacturing Decline - Canada’s factories have to compete with others around the world - Only in 21 century do we get truly globalized competition - Businesses view labour and wages as an expense - Large amount of desperate workers - Control as big of question as expense (being able to control their workers), no unions or resistance - Environmental Regulation: Some places refuse to have regulations - Substance: Governments giving money/building roads for a new factory in order to attract workers Global Competitiveness - Garment Industry: Leading area for when countries start industrial activity, easy to move, garments are an essential, cheap labour/sweatshops, major employer, big part of unionization, old factories get turned into townhouses, loss of garment industry in North America effects small towns - Rubber Industry: Tires, one of the biggest industries/employers, employed more people than steel industry (Hamilton #2 employer), big incentives to move overseas because it is very labour intensive, rubber is a highly toxic industry - Automotive Industry: Prime target for countries to attract industry, also a sign for developing countries that they’re coming of age, Canada had a very productive th automotive industry (10 in the world) - High Tech Production: Cellphones/laptops, many leaders claimed this would be the manufacturing that
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