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Lecture 12

LIFESCI 3J03 Lecture 12: Anthropometry
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Department
Life Sciences
Course Code
LIFESCI 3J03
Professor
Dr.Dowling

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Life Sci 3J03 – Lecture 12 - Anthropometry
-Next midterm will be shorter
-Will get test back and he will take it up
Anthropometry
-The science that deals with the measurement of size, mass, shape and inertial
properties of the human body
-Look at some very basic dimensions of the human body, these dimensions are often
called body segment parameters (BSPs) and the list includes:
oTotal body height, total body mass, body segment lengths, body segment
masses, body segment centres of gravity, total body centre of gravity, body
segment moments of inertia, body segment radii of gyration
oEasily measured things: total body height and mass
oBody segment masses: not easily measured
-Body segment lengths can be measured fairly easily and accurately on living human
subjects by using a cloth tape measure
-Can make simplifying assumption that all humans have similar segment length ratios of
their whole body height, can use figure below
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-Total body height is represented by “H” and the dimension of length of important
segments is given by the portion of H
-Fairly useful as first approximation but of course everyone is different
-Ex. Find the forearm length of a person with a total body height of 1.8m
oLength = 0.146H = 0.146(1.8) = 0.263m
-Ex. Find the thigh length of a person who has a height of 1.58m
oLength = 0.53H – 0.285H = 0.245(1.58) = 0.387m
-Location of an object’s centre is called the “centre of mass” or the “centre of gravity
(CofG)
-W.T. Dempster, a researcher for the US Air Force in the 1950s created a table with
determined data for human segments
CofG location within a single segment
-Given the XY coordinates of the proximal and distal ends of a segment, we can find the
coordinates of the location of the segments CofG
-Consider the thigh segment shown below with hip coordinates of (8,25) and knee
coordinates of (23,8) and find the coordinates of the CofG
-Started at the proximal end (Hip) and moved toward the CofG
oStart at proximal coordinate and move toward the distal end (positive X direction
and negative Y direction)
oDistance moved was table value times the segment length in each direction
which is the difference in the coordinates between the proximal and distal ends
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Description
Life Sci 3J03 – Lecture 12 - Anthropometry - Next midterm will be shorter - Will get test back and he will take it up Anthropometry - The science that deals with the measurement of size, mass, shape and inertial properties of the human body - Look at some very basic dimensions of the human body, these dimensions are often called body segment parameters (BSPs) and the list includes: o Total body height, total body mass, body segment lengths, body segment masses, body segment centres of gravity, total body centre of gravity, body segment moments of inertia, body segment radii of gyration o Easily measured things: total body height and mass o Body segment masses: not easily measured - Body segment lengths can be measured fairly easily and accurately on living human subjects by using a cloth tape measure - Can make simplifying assumption that all humans have similar segment length ratios of their whole body height, can use figure below - Total body height is represented by “H” and the dimension of length of important segments is given by the portion of H - Fairly useful as first approximation but of course everyone is different - Ex. Find the forearm length of a person with a total body height of 1.8m o Length = 0.146H = 0.146(1.8) = 0.263m - Ex. Find the thigh length of a person who has a height of 1.58m o Length = 0.53H – 0.285H = 0.245(1.58) = 0.387m - Location of an object’s centre is called the “centre of mass” or the “centre of gravity” (CofG) - W.T. Dempster, a researcher for the US Air Force in the 1950s created a table with determined data for human segments CofG location within a single segment - Given the XY coordinates of the proximal and distal ends of a segment, we can find the coordinates of the location of the segments CofG - Consider the thigh segment shown below with hip coordinates of (8,25) and knee coordinates of (23,8) and find the coordinates of the CofG - Started at the proximal end (Hip) and moved toward the CofG o Start at proximal coordinate and move toward the distal end (positive X direction and negative Y direction) o Distance moved was table value times the segment length in each direction which is the difference in the coordinates between the proximal and distal ends CofG location of a multi-linked segment system - Human body is an example of a system of many linked segments - In order to find the location of the CofG of a multi-linked segment system,
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