Class Notes (834,721)
Canada (508,692)
Mathematics (2,071)
MATH 1LS3 (344)
Lecture

MATH 1LS3 – TEXTBOOK NOTES.docx

3 Pages
695 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Mathematics
Course
MATH 1LS3
Professor
Miroslav Lovric
Semester
Fall

Description
MATH 1LS3 – TEXTBOOK NOTES INTRODUCTION TO MODELS AND FUNCTIOS: This chapter introduces the main tools needed to study biology using mathematics:  models and functions. A model is a collection of mathematical objects (such as functions  and equations) that allows us to interpret biological problems in math. Biological  phenomena are often described by measurements: a set of numeric values with units  (such as kilograms or meters). Many relations between measurements are described by  functions, which assign to each input value a unique output value. After talking about what constitutes a math model and presenting a few examples, we  briefly review functions and their properties.  In the two sections of this chapter, we discuss the domain and range and the graph of a  function, algebraic operations with functions, composition of functions, and the  inverse functions. We build new functions from old using shifting, scaling, and reflections. We catalogue  important elementary functions and note their properties. We introduce the four  approaches­­­­ algebraic, numeric, geometric, and verbal that we us throughout the book  to discuss functions, their properties, and their applications 0.1: MODELS IN LIFE SCIENCES In this book, we use the language of mathematics to describe quantitatively how living  systems work and to develop the mathematical tools needed to compute how they change.  From measurements describing the initial state of a system and a set of rules describing  how change occurs, we will attempt to predict what will happen to the system. For example, by knowing the initial amount of drug taken (caffeine, Tylenol, alcohol etc.)  and how it is processed by the liver (dynamical rules), we can predict how long the drug  will stay in the body and its effects. To study a life sciences phenomenon using mathematics, we build a model. How does a  model work? First, we identify a problem we need to study, or question we need to answer. Assume  that a virus (say H1N1) appears within a population. Will the virus spread? How many people will get infected? How many will die? Will our hospitals have  adequate resources to treat increasing numbers of patients? These are just a handful of the  questions that we would like to know the answers to. Underlying all them is the basic  questions: we know (approximately) how many people are infected today. How many  will be infected tomorrow? In three days? I
More Less

Related notes for MATH 1LS3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit