Class Notes (835,539)
Canada (509,225)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 1B03 (370)
Wil Waluchow (161)
Lecture

Philosophy 1B03 February 10th 2014 MILL.docx

4 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 1B03
Professor
Wil Waluchow
Semester
Winter

Description
Philosophy 1B03 February 10  2014 MILL  The legal Enforcement of Morality Fundamental Question to be answered: • How much latitude should a democratic society be given to regulate the moral behavior  of its individual members? Today • “On Liberty” (1859) by: J.S. Mill • The law should afford the individual a wide space of action to pursue her own moral  projects and determine her own conception of the moral good  Thursday • “Morals and the Criminal Law” (1965) by: Lord Patrick Devlin • The ‘general public’ through the law, has a right to protect itself against behavior it  considers to be morally repugnant John Stuart Mill (1806­1873) • On Liberty (1859) • Objective: o To investigate, “…the nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately  exercised by society over the individual” (306) • Why is an investigation into these limits so important? o “All that makes existence valuable to any one, depends on the enforcement of  restraints upon the actions of other people” (309) • Consider the alternative o Everyone may do whatever he or she would like, without any recourse to the law  or even to social pressure  This may sound good but it is not Hobbes (from ‘Leviathan’): • “Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of war, where every man is enemy to every  man, the same is consequent to the time wherein men live without other security than  what their own strength and their own invention shall furnish them withal. In such  condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain, and  consequently, no culture of the earth, no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may  be imported by sea...no arts, no letters, no society, and which is worst of all, continual  fear and danger of violent death, and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and  short.” • As a society we require the ability to impose certain regulations on the behavior of  individuals, such that we as a society, and individuals themselves, may successfully  accomplish its goals  • BUT…. How much regulation is too much? Mill discusses two sources of regulation within society: 1. By the way a physical force, in the form of legal penalties 2. By the way of moral coercion, through public opinion  • In both cases, the limit for how far these sources may legitimately regulate an individuals  behavior is dependent on whether its goal is, “… to prevent harm to others” (313) • This is called the Mill’s Harm Principle In other words • For Mill, neither the government (through the law), nor the general public (through a  general disapprobation), may infringe upon the actions of any individuals unless that  individual’s actions may be considered to be of harm to someone else  What kind of actions may be considered harmful? 1. Acts which are done to another individual causing harm  a. Murder b. Theft c. Slander d. Etc. 2. Acts which by failing to do them may result in harm to another individual a. Saving a fellow creatures life b. Interposing to protect defenseless against ill­usage c. Etc. So any other action that is neither 1. Directly causes harm to another individual (through action) 2. Indirectly causes harm to another individual (through failure to act) • Will be considered outside the scope of any regulation whatsoever  • In other words, any action that does not violate Mill’s Harm Principle should be  considered: o The appropriate region of human liberty (315) This region includes: • Liberty of conscience o Freedom of thought and feeling o Freedom of opinion o Freedom of expression • Liberty of Tastes and Pursuits o Freedom to frame the plan of one’s own life o Freedom to pursue one’s own goals • Liberty of association o Freedom of persons to combine for any purpose  RE­CAP • Mill argues that it is of vital importance that some actions be regulated by society  o Through law and public opinion • These should be limited only
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 1B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit