Class Notes (835,377)
Canada (509,147)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 1B03 (370)
Wil Waluchow (161)
Lecture

Philosophy 1B03 February 13th 2014 Devlin.docx

4 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 1B03
Professor
Wil Waluchow
Semester
Winter

Description
Philosophy 1B03 February 13  2014 Lord Patrick Devlin (1905­1992) Morals and the Criminal Law (1965) • Objective o “Society is entitles by means of its laws (to take) the same steps to  preserve its moral code as it does to preserve its government and other  essential institutions” (380) o In this piece, Devlin is responding to the findings of the Wolfenden Report,  which essentially argued that:  “Unless a deliberate attempt is to be made by society, acting  through the agency of the law, to equate the sphere of crime with  that of sin, there must remain a realm of private morality and  immorality which is, in brief and crude terms, not the law’s  business” (371) o So, in other words, the findings of the Wolfenden Report agreed that  Mill’s Harm Principle exhausted the legitimate grounds upon which the  criminal law could limit individual liberty  (i.e., ‘victimless crimes’, such as prostitution, homosexual  behaviour between consenting adults, etc. was not within the  purview of the criminal law) o Devlin objects to the reasoning of Wolfenden Report o His argument is that there is no such thing as a private morality that can  relevantly e distinguished from a public morality  Distinctions Between Private and Public • Private o In private  o Personal code o Personal harm  o Personal concern • Public o In public o Public code o Public harm o Public concern  • Wolfenden Report findings: o Some actions which are done in private (1) are not of public concern (4)  because they do not cause public harm (3) • Devlin’s objection: o Any act which is a violation of public morality (2) is of public concern (4)  and therefore may necessarily cause public harm (3), even if it is private  (1) • Devlin’s position is developed in response to 3 questions: 1. Ought there to be a public morality, or are morals always a matter of  private judgment? a. Answer: Ought there to be a public morality, or are morals always  a matter of private judgment? 2. If society has the right to pass judgment, does it also have the right to use  the weapon of law to enforce it? a. Answer: If society has the right to pass judgment, does it also have  the right to use the weapon of law to enforce it? 3. According to what principles should the law not be used to enforce the  judgments of society? a. According to what principles should the law not be used to enforce  the judgments of society? Question 1 Continued • One must be careful to distinguish between ‘private matters’ in morality, and  private morality per se • Although we may act ‘in private’, our actions are always open to the moral  judgment of others • As such, there is no private morality  o Actions which may only be judged by the individual performing the act • In this way, all morality is essentially public o Open to the evaluation of others • The reason there is no private morality per se, is that society is, to a large extent  anyway, a ‘community of ideas’ • Much of the content making up that ‘community of ideas’ is a society’s public  morality  o How society in fact evaluates certain behaviour  • This means that  o The very identity of a society will depend in large part on a shared sense  of its public morality o As Devlin states, these values of public morality are, “built into the house  in which we live and could not be removed without bringing it down”  (377) • This leads Devlin to put forward his Disintegration Thesis • Without a shared, public morality society would be prone to disintegrate • Thus, society has the right to enforce morality as such to prevent the very  disintegration of society • In this way, argues Devlin, moral sedition (i.e., an incitement against the pubic  morality of a society) is at least as dangerous as political sedition or treason (i.e.,  an incitement against the political situation of a society) Question 2 Continued • YES! • Pace the Disintegration Thesis, society is fully within its rights to criminalize  individual acts that offend the public morality in order to ensure its continued  stability • “...if society has the right to make a judgment and has it on the basis that a  recognized morality is as necessary to society as, say, a recognized government,  then society may use the law to preserve morality in the same way as it uses 
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 1B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit