Class Notes (837,484)
Canada (510,274)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 1B03 (370)
Wil Waluchow (161)
Lecture

Philosophy 1B03 March 3rd Feinberg.docx

7 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 1B03
Professor
Wil Waluchow
Semester
Winter

Description
Philosophy 1B03 March 3  2014 Feinberg  Civil Disobedience  • The deliberate breaking of the law for the purpose of addressing an injustice, or  what is perceived to be an injustice, in an otherwise reasonably just society Two Articles  1. Civil Disobedience in the Modern World’ by: Joel Feinberg 2. ‘Limits to the Moral Claim in Civil Disobedience’ by: Harry Prosch Our Question • Is the individual morally justified in engaging in acts of civil disobedience  against the state  A Bit of history  • The general idea of civil disobedience has been around at least since the Greeks  (e.g., Sophocles’ play Antigone) but was terminologically introduced by the  American thinker Henry David Thoreau in 1849 as the title of a short essay • In ‘Civil Disobedience’, Thoreau argued that the private citizen should consider  himself morally responsible for the actions he commits on behalf of his  government, even if those actions are required by law • For Thoreau, it is therefore morally justifiable (and even morally required) for the  individual to act in contravention of the law if the law stands in opposition to  one’s moral convictions o (e.g., Thoreau personally refused to pay taxes, claiming that to do so  would be an endorsement of both the Mexican­American War, as well as  the continued practice of slavery in the United States) • HOWEVER o Since Thoreau’s essay, the term ‘civil disobedience’ has come to be  applied to a number of conflicts between government and citizen, many of  which have only loose resemblances to each other • It is therefore of primary importance that we first get a grip on what civil  disobedience is before we assess the question of whether or not it is justified as a  way for the private citizen to express her moral position on some matter What Civil Disobedience is  NOT 1. It is not ordinary law­breaking a. Civil disobedience requires that an action be done from certain motives  only b. So, whereas most ordinary crimes are committed from egocentric motives  (e.g., personal gain, malice, hate, etc.), acts of civil disobedience are  undertaken on the basis of a genuine moral conviction held by the agent     2. It is not an attempt to overthrow an entire regime a. Civil disobedience is an action committed by citizens who belong to  reasonably just societies and who therefore do not wish to overturn the  state or system of government en masse, but to merely improve one or a  few of its ‘unjust’ laws 3. It is not morally motivated rule departures by state officials a. Although these departures have much in common with acts of civil  disobedience, acts of civil disobedience are reserved for the private citizen  only b. (e.g., when a police officer fails to apply the law on the basis of her  conscience, she is not thereby committing an act of civil disobedience) 4. It is not to act out of necessity a. Since most modern legal systems accept ‘necessity’ as a justifiable  defense, when one breaks the law for this reason, one is not thereby  engaging in an act of civil disobedience b. (e.g., speeding on the way to a hospital to save a life; destroying another’s  property to prevent the spread of a raging fire; etc.)   5. It is not to ‘test the law’ a. If one breaks the law in order to gain standing to test the validity of that  law, one is not engaging in an act of civil disobedience (though he is  getting quite close to it) (e.g., if one openly smokes a marijuana cigarette in front of a police  officer to gain standing in a court of law to challenge the constitutionality  of the statute which forbids the smoking of marijuana) 6. The relevant distinction here: a. The ‘lawbreaker’ in this case is not intentionally violating the law per se. b. Instead, she is challenging a form of behaviour that she believes is  completely within her legal rights, despite the fact that the courts have  treated that behaviour (in her opinion incorrectly) otherwise What Civil Disobedience IS • Civil disobedience is: o “a public, nonviolent, conscientious yet political act contrary to law  usually done with the aim of bringing about a change in the law or policies  of the government” (Rawls, ‘A Theory of Justice’, p.320) o It should be noted that almost every one of the criteria outlined by Rawls  has been challenged. There are, however, good reasons to hold to each of  them, and so we will proceed from this definition 1. Public a. Acts of civil disobedience are engaged in openly and publicly  b. They are not covert acts of law­breaking undertaken as a show of force  (terrorism) or on the basis of personal gain (theft) 2. Non­violent a. Acts of civil disobedience are typically understood to be non­violent in  nature b. They are not militant acts against the state or other citizens aimed at  remedying some social injustice (e.g., the tactic used by the Women’s  Suffrage Movement in the early 20th century) • The tactical reason for both the public and non­violent aspect of civil  disobedience is to ensure that the action has the best possible chance to address  the public’s sense of justice (which is also why many civil disobedients will accept  the punishment of the state) o By acting covertly and/or violently, the public at large is apt to dismiss the  message behind the action as being illegitimate 3. Deliberate Unlawfulness a. One must deliberately break the law to engage in civil disobedience b. However, this does not mean that one must break the precise law that is  being challenged  c. (e.g., ‘sit ins’ are not often designed to protest ‘anti­trespass’ laws, but  rather to protest some other law the disobedient wishes would change) 4. Conscientiousness a. As stated earlier, the motivation fuelling an act of civil disobedience must  be based on one’s conscience or sincere moral conviction  b. (To be considered an act of civil disobedience, it is not enough that one act  to stand on one’s rights; one must act from the conviction that one is right) • So when, or under what circumstances, are acts of civil disobedience morally  justified? o Doesn’t the fact that civil disobedience is by definition (at least the one  we’ve offered) a public, non­violent act based on sincere moral  convictions mean that it will be justified in all cases?    • The way Feinberg (in his ‘Civil Disobedience in the Modern World’) will answer  this question is by assessing the extent to which private citizens have a duty to  obey the law • Generally speaking, citizens tend to hold to two (seemingly) discordant beliefs: o On the one hand, they believe that there exists a prima facie moral  obligation to obey the law o On the other hand, they believe that there exists a prima facie moral  obligation to obey one’s conscience and to fight for what’s right! A Terminological Point • Prima Facie Obligations: o These are obligations that hold ‘other­things­being­equal’, but that can be  defeated by stronger obligations o (e.g., the prima facie moral obligation to tell the truth will hold
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 1B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit