Class Notes (837,848)
Canada (510,512)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 1B03 (370)
Wil Waluchow (161)
Lecture

Philosophy 1B03 March 6th 2014 Prosch.docx

6 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 1B03
Professor
Wil Waluchow
Semester
Winter

Description
Philosophy 1B03 March 6  2014 Prosch Civil Disobedience 2 • The deliberate breaking of the law for the purpose of addressing an injustice, or what is  perceived to be an injustice, in an otherwise just society General Categories of Protest 1. Civil Disobedience 2. Conscientious Refusal 3. Militant Action 4. Revolutionary Action Civil Disobedience • As we have seen, one of the most notable definitions of civil disobedience is the one  offered by John Rawls: Civil disobedience is, “a public, nonviolent, conscientious yet political act contrary to law  usually done with the aim of bringing about a change in the law or policies of the  government” Rawls’ definition, however, glosses over two very important characteristics of civil  disobedience: • a.) The purpose of civil disobedience is to challenge a law (or set of laws) with the hope  that its remedy will improve what is already considered to be a relatively good situation • b.) Therefore, civil disobedience is best regarded as a communicative act  rather than as a coercive act Tactic • To successfully communicate a moral message to one’s fellow citizens, and to convince  them of its rightness • (this is, e.g., why Rawls insists the act must be delivered openly and non­violently­­both  are conducive of convincing others of the moral worth of one’s action) Conscientious Refusal • A refusal to participate in some action the state mandates as obligatory (rather than  committing an action that is in violation of some state­issued rule) • E.g., refusing to go to war upon being conscripted; a refusal to pay one’s taxes on moral  grounds (Thoreau) • Tactic o By refusing to participate in some state activity that one considers to be morally  wrong (e.g., fighting in a war), the agent can be assured that his ‘hands are  clean’ of that moral wrong Militant Action • A form of protest whereby one uses forceful or coercive means to achieve one’s ends  (e.g., through violence to persons or damage to property) • E.g., the destruction of store fronts and golf courses during the Women’s Suffrage  Movement; Black Bloc’s lighting cars on fire at the G20 Summit in Toronto • Tactic o To instil fear and instability in a society to either  a.) Ensure an explicit demand is met (Women’s Suffrage); or,   b.) Ensure society is made aware that the status quo is unacceptable  (Black Bloc) Revolutionary Action • A form of protest aimed at supplanting:  o a.) The existing head of state;  o b.) The existing form of government; or,  o c.) Both • E.g., the October Revolution; the Arab­Spring protest movements; the recent protest  movement in Kyiv • TACTIC: o Not to improve upon an already reasonably just situation, but to tear down and  start again o Something about the existing regime (e.g., the Ukraine) or about the existing form  of government (e.g., Libya) is intolerable and must therefore be completely  abandoned and replaced “Limits to the Moral Claim in Civil Disobedience” (1965) By: Harry Prosch • Objective of the Article: o To explore whether acts of civil disobedience can be justified on the basis of the  genuine moral conviction of the agent • Recall Feinberg’s conclusion for when civil disobedience is morally justified • It is if: o a.) The action does not conflict with any other prima facie moral obligation o b.) The action is a response to an issue that is of such pressing moral concern, it  outweighs another prima facie moral obligation • We may think of Prosch’s argument as an elaboration on (b) o How is the agent to know if some issue is of such pressing moral concern that it  outweighs an existing prima facie moral obligation? • First Move: o “Civil disobedience is not a moral claim made only in words, but rather one made  in actions...” (p.103) o Therefore, it cannot be ignored in the way one can ignore mere words o The civil disobedient, by expressing her moral claim through action, “demands a  decision for or against itself” (p.104) • Prosch considers the most likely argument in favour of civil disobedience: o By disobeying in a civil manner, the agent compels the authorities to confront the  morally questionable law by either choosing to enforce it (which would be  tantamount to an affirmation of its legitimacy) or choosing not to enforce it  (which would be tantamount to a denial of its legitimacy) • In essence, the disobedient compels the authorities to answer the following question: o “Do they believe in the rightness of these laws firmly enough to continue  enforcing them upon people who keep coming back to be arrested or even  beaten?” (p.104)  (e.g., the Freedom Riders during the civil rights movement in the United  States) • Considered this way, civil disobedience looks like a form of moral persuasion o It is a way to address one’s interlocutor on some moral issue and to compel that  interlocutor to come to terms with the issue in question o (e.g., bus segregation) • BUT... Prosch is suspicious of viewing acts of civil disobedience as a form of  moral persuasion • Moral persuasion, says Prosch, is generally considered to be a form of argument o (i.e., reasons put forward in support of some particular way of looking at an issue) • And, since civil disobedience is an action, it does not fit the criteria for an argument, and  thus does not fit the criteria for being a form of moral persuasion • Instead, claims Prosch, your opponents, “must...tend to regard [your effort] as a power  move...[E]ven though your action is non­violent, its first consequence must be to place  you and your opponents in a state of war. For your opponents now have only the same  sort of choice that an army has: that of allowing you to continue occupying the heights  you have moved to, or of applying force” (p.104) • In other words, Acts of civil disobedience are not a means to persuade your interlocutor  ‘to see things your way’, but rather to force your interlocutor to come to terms with a  particular issue of debate A Concession • If, claims Prosch, your actions actually succeed in uncovering the more deeply held  principles of your interlocu
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 1B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit