Class Notes (838,386)
Canada (510,872)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 2D03 (144)
Lecture

Utilitarianism/Virtue Ethics- Theories Continued

5 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 2D03
Professor
Stefan Rodde
Semester
Fall

Description
Monday, September 16, 2013. Act Utilitarianism • I.e. Jeremy Bentham (1748­1832) • Practical Problems o How do you determine if an action maximizes utility or not • Theoretical Problems o Special Relationships and Special Duties Problem  Required to treat everyone equally, doesn’t matter relationship o Free Rider Problem  Possible to maximize utility by taking a free ride­happy because you  do not need to pay fare, does not decrease anyone’s utility o Justice Problem  Sacrifice innocent life for the majority Rule Utilitarianism • A moral rule whose general observance tends to maximize utility or minimize  disutility is genuine o I.e. Jean Stuart Mill (1806­1873) • Act Utilitarianism o Principle of Utility ­> Right Action • Rule Utilitarianism o Principle of Utility ­> Moral Rules ­> Right Action • POU determines whether a moral rule is genuine/spurious • RU­Mountain climbing example­ rope breaks, stranger is very involved within  community, best friend is not, who do you save? o Rule that you have special duty to your friends and family, not to strangers, if  you are to follow this rule, then you would save your friend over the stranger • Free Rider Problem o RU­general rule that you should pay for what you get, RU would say you  should pay for your service, do not take a free ride • Justice Problem, healthy person in hospital, 5 patients each need organs and can be  saved with 1 healthy person, kill healthy person or let 5 sick patients die? o RU­rule says do not kill so do not kill healthy person, not killing 5 patients • Take care of a large number of children. Children are hungry and there is no way to  feed the, unless you steal food. Is it morally permissible to steal food to feed the  starving children? o Rule says do not steal, another rule says do not let children starve o NO: The RU seems to fetishize rules o YES: RU falls back into AU Deontological Ethics • Utilitarianism: Rightness/wrongness is based on consequences • Deontology: Consequences are morally irrelevant; don’t matter • Immanual Kant (1724­1804) • Conditions for moral action: o Right Intentions: You must intend to do the right thing o Right Motives: You must do it for the right reason •  Right Motives  o 3 men have opportunity to commit adultery o Decide not to do it for 3 different reasons  1  man: Worried about getting caught  2  man: Loves his wife, doesn’t want to cause her pain RD  3  man: Recognizes adultery is wrong o Which man had the right motive for action?  According to Kant, 3  man had the right motive for action ST ND • 1  and 2  man­ doing right thing is based on  circumstances, if 100 % sure that 1 and 2  wives would  never know, most likely to commit adultery • 3  man won’t do it because he know adultery is wrong­ whether he gets caught or not, getting caught is not one of  his reasons o For an action to have moral worth, an agent must do the right thing because it  is the right thing to do o A person must act from the motive of duty  A person must be motivated by respect for the moral law •  Right Inten  o How do we determine what we should and should not do? o Maxim: a general principle which specifies how I conceive of an action and  my reason for doing it   Examples:   If I am hungry, I will eat  If I want people to trust me, I will keep my promises  If lying to a patient will prevent distress to them, I will lie to them  If I have opportunity to commit adultery without being caught, I  will do it. •  Maxims   • I can formulate maxim for every action which I can perform • Which maxims should I follow? o How do I determine which maxims represent genuine ethical rules? • The Categorical Imperative (CI) o 3 different ways to express: o  Universal Law Formulation   I ought never to act except in such a way that I can also will that  my act should become a universal law  Moral rules (laws) are supposed to be universal  If a maxim cannot be universalized, it is not a genuine rule and so  should not be followed  I.e. a man has opportunity to cheat on his wife with very little risk  of being caught • Maxim: If I can commit adultery without being cause, I  will do so. • What would happen if everyone made it their policy to  commit adultery? If everyone makes it his or her policy to  commit adultery, there would be no adultery. Marriage is a  res
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 2D03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit