Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Philosophy (1,234)
PHILOS 2D03 (144)
Lecture

Ethical Theories

4 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 2D03
Professor
Stefan Rodde
Semester
Fall

Description
Monday, September 23, 2013. Religion 2C03 Lecture 3 Ethical Monism vs. Ethical Pluralism • Monistic Ethical Theories hold that there is a single ultimate principle of morality o Utilitarianism: Principle of Utility o Deontology: Categorical Imperative  Justice sometimes is at odds with utility in both theories • Pluralistic Ethical Theories hold that there are many basic principles of morality • Ethical Pluralism=W. D. Ross (1877­1971) Duty • “Primae Facie” Duties o These are fundamental ethical obligations o They are intuitive o They are universally organized o Can’t explain to someone why they should agree with these duties • Actual Duties o The duties we have in a particular situation o It is often unclear what our actual duties are o Reasonable people can disagree about them Primae Facie Duties • Fidelity: to keep our promise • Reparation: to compensate victims • Gratitude: to return favors for favors • Justice: to share goods fairly • Beneficence: to improve the condition of others • Self­Improvement: to improve our own condition • Non­Maleficence: to not injure others Actual Duties • In our ordinary lives we often find that the primae facie duties compete and conflict  with each other • Our actual duty is what we should do in that particular situation o I.e. should I keep my promise to be home by 8:00 or stay out to help a  friend in distress?  Fidelity: keep promise  Beneficence: help friend  My actual duty is what I should do in this situation Problem • What should I do if two PF duties conflict? • What should I do if the same duty recommends two different courses of action? • Use your best judgment • Is this a good answer? Good Judgment • People who generally make good judgments possess a number of characteristics o Unbiased o Not overcome by emotions o Careful (weigh all the evidence) o Justify their decisions Principlism • A framework for ethical decision making in the biomedical context • Healthcare practitioners should make decisions in accordance with following  principles o Autonomy o Non­maleficence o Beneficence o Justice Virtue Ethics (VE) Aristotle (384­322 BCE) Human Action • Human action is goal oriented o We act for the sake of an end • What is the ultimate goal of human action? o To achieve a good life Ethical Action and the Good Life • If living a good life is something that we ought to do, then understanding what a good  life is, is essential for ethical action • VE is a self­interest ethic o Reason why you should act a certain way is in your best interest Good Life • What is required for a good life? o Externals (health, economic well being, etc.)  I.e. person living in dump or person with chronic pain is not living the  good life o Activity  Being social and intellectual  I.e. a person in a coma is not living the good life, a “couch potato” is  not living a good life; have to be active  Activity has to be distinctive of human beings • Person that chases after a st
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 2D03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit