Class Notes (837,548)
Canada (510,312)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 1XX3 (1,109)
Dr.A (1)
Lecture

MODULE- Hunger and Chemical Senses.docx

5 Pages
99 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 1XX3
Professor
Dr.A
Semester
Winter

Description
MODULE: Hunger & the Chemical Senses ­Glucose is the preferred source of energy for the brain because the brain cannot use fat  energy storage for fuel ­Glucose is stored as glycogen, which is, released in­between meals when needed (in  muscles and liver) ­After you eat a meal there is an influx of sugars, pancreas secretes insulin to help with  the uptake of glucose (for immediate use and storage) and will later break down the  glycogen in the liver into glucose when needed  ­Stored glucose as glycogen is called adipose ­Hunger = depleted glucose & glycogen storage, liver sends signal to brain for food  NPY   (Neuropeptide Y)  ­A potent appetite stimulant  ­High levels in hypothalamus are associated with increased appetite and food seeking  behavior (ex. Opening fridge) ­Increased NPY in all other mammals and fish etc.  ­‘‘ON’’ switch for appetite  Satiety: to stop eating, triggered by a signal from liver to brain EXAMPLE: If you inject glucose into a dog’s vein that connects directly to the liver then  it stops eating but when the glucose is injected into a different vein, the dog will continue  to eat Small Intestine ­As food as ingested and travels throughout your body the small intestine produces  cholecystokinin (CCK) which is a hormone that is responsible for feelings of satiety or  fullness after a meal. ­SHORT­TERM satiety signal ­Receptors in brain detect CCK and that serves as a signal to stop eating EXPERIMENT: Rats injected with CCK had shorter meal durations than the control  groups but they ate MORE meals per day so total intake was similar ­Whenever possible, long­term energy storage takes place in the form of fat (ex. Adipose  tissue) ­Body weight is the regulation of overall energy balance WHY STORE AS FAT (ADIPOSE TISSUE) INSTEAD OF GLYCOGEN? ­1 g= 9 kcal instead of 4kcal ­Fat is also formed in all parts of the body  Adipose Tissue (Fat) ­Classified as an endocrine organ ­Secretes a hormone called leptin, which is involved in long­term energy balance and  correlated with fat mass ­Increased leptin, they act on hypothalamus to reduce appetite and food consumption  decreased EXPERIMENT:  ­Leptin production is controlled by the OB gene ­Genetically modified mice that lack the OB gene, leptin production stops, which means  that the hormone signal to regulate appetite is missing and the mice become fat ­HOW TO FIX THIS: give regular injections of leptin *not the case in humans ­If you give Leptin to a normal mouse than the mouse is leptin resistant and beyond a  certain point the ability to inhibit appetite is reduced (too much weight loss=not weight  loss) Evolution of Leptin ­Served as a signal that low energy left in body because it was more likely that food was  scarce than a luxury ­Explains humans being leptin resistant  EXPLANATION: Leptin will inhibit actions of NPY; NPY increase is prevented by leptin  leading to decreased appetite and energy consumption. ­The two will interact and regulate your weight EXPERIMENT: ­Rat suggests that NPY neurons can specifically affect reward driven feeing for high  calorie foods such as sucrose ­Rats were injected into the brain with NPY after already consuming a full meal which  resulted in (1) an increase in the intake of sucrose (2) rats will begin to work harder for a  cue associated with sucrose (3) rats also increased the consumption of saccharin (same  taste as sucrose but less calories) (4) rats will choose a diet of carbohydrates over protein  or fat ­This suggests that NPY action promotes unconditional and conditional behaviors that  specifically lead to increased carbohydrate consumption ­This experiment depends on the rats initial preference for carbohydrates (rats with initial  preference will have increased preference) This shows evidence for a genetic  predisposition for carbohydrates  Endogenous Opioids ­Natural morphine­like actions within the body and contribute to palatability and reward­ driven feeding.  ­Blocking the opioid re
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 1XX3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit