Class Notes (837,673)
Canada (510,394)
Brock University (12,132)
Psychology (32)
PSYCH 2AA3 (29)
Lecture

Lecture 27 (November 21).docx

5 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2AA3
Professor
Jennifer Ostovich
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 27 (Wednesday, November 21, 2012) Outline ­ Kohlberg describes 3 levels 1. Pre – conventional 2. Conventional 3. Post – conventional ­ Each level has 2 stages ­ Each stage shows a more cognitively and morally advanced way of thinking about moral dilemmas  Level 1: Preconventional Morality ­ Moral judgments are based on consequences to self ­ What good will this behaviour bring me? 1. Stage 1: Punishment and Obedience Orientation ­ Things that get us punished are bad ­ Things that do not get us punished are good ­ Older people must be obeyed ­ Will often say something like: Heinz would be wrong to steal because it’s against the law, it’s bad to  steal because you will be punished  ­ Very rarely will kids in this stage will agree that Heinz could steal the drug  ­ It’s all about whether you will get punished 2. Stage 2: Self – Interest Orientation ­ We stop thinking about punishment and we look at how things feel ­ Things that make us feel good are good (and vice versa)  ­ It is fair (moral) to reciprocate both good and bad acts  Concept of fair exchange = if someone does something good for you, you should do something good  for them (and vice versa), etc.  ­ You may feel bad for doing something bad for someone because you are worried that they might do  something bad to you (selfish thinking, you don’t really care about the other person) ­ Would say something like: Heinz was right to steal the drug for his wife because she will do  something good for him (self – interest)  ­ It is all about self – interest, they are mainly looking out for themselves in a way  1 Lecture 27 (Wednesday, November 21, 2012) ­ This is evident in elementary school  Level 2: Conventional Morality ­ Moral judgments are now based on membership in some reference group  ­ Reference group refers to what group you use to determine what is right and wrong 1. Stage 3: Interpersonal Relationships ­ Concern for other people ­ Motivation determines morality (if it’s based on good motives, it is a good thing) ­ Interested in caring for people who matter to you ­ Would say: Heinz was right that he stole the drug because he was doing it out of love for his wife,  they would even say that the druggist is a bad person because he had bad intentions  2. Stage 4: Maintaining Social Order ­ Concern for society as a whole ­ Cultural – level obedience determines morality  ­ If there is a law, you must follow it even if it will hurt someone to follow the law ­ If you don’t follow the laws because society will fall apart ­ Would say: Heinz should be punished because he broke the law and he shouldn’t be able to get away  with it ­ Conventional morality is more feminist and collectivist than the next stage, which is more masculine  and individualistic  Level 3: Post – Conventional Morality ­ Very few people achieve this reasoning ­ There is something larger than rules of society  ­ You are going to challenge your culture to change 1. Stage 5: Individual Rights Orientation ­ Concern for basic individual rights leads to questioning of conventional rues ­ BUT democratic processes must be adhered to  ­ You have got more abstract, contrast in thinking  ­ They believe that some laws should be changed using the democratic process to their advantage  2 Lecture 27 (Wednesday, November 21, 2012) ­ They would say: It is not right to steal, but Heinz has to steal the drug to save his wife and he also has  to be punished for breaking the law but not so severely ­ He has to protect his right to life, life is more important than property, but at the same time they do  believe that he has to be punished but not strongly because the law is wrong 2. Stage 6: Universal Ethical Principles ­ Quest for true social justice leads to breaking with 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2AA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit