Class Notes (839,394)
Canada (511,324)
Brock University (12,137)
Psychology (32)
PSYCH 2AA3 (29)
Lecture

Lecture 31 (November 29).docx

7 Pages
77 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYCH 2AA3
Professor
Jennifer Ostovich

This preview shows pages 1 and half of page 2. Sign up to view the full 7 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 31 (Thursday, November 29, 2012) Predictors of Attachment Style 1. Emotional availability of the parents ­ They have to be able to form a connection with their children  ­ There are many reasons why you might be distracted from forming such a bond with their infant  ­ Something beyond physical needs 2. Sensitivity/responsiveness ­ Developing that synchrony where the parent responds to the signals that the baby gives  ­ They are paying attention and answering back with the appropriate response  Example  ▯Van Den Boom (1994) in training sensitivity   ­ Recruited 100 mothers and their new born babies who had at birth been rated difficult (babies) and  low in responding to babies cues (mothers)  ­ Half of the mothers had training and half of them didn’t have training ­ Then Van Den Boom assessed the effectiveness of the training by the mothers  ­ He found that the training worked and that these 12 month – old babies were more likely to have a  secure attachment to their mothers if their mothers had the training ­ There seems to be a longitudinal effect, so we can identify at risk families and we can do training  which can alter the likelihood of attachment styles occurring  3. Temperament  ­ 40% of babies have easy temperaments and 65% of babies are securely attached  ­ These babies are easy to parent  ­ Basically parents with difficult babies feel rejected a lot and they can end up giving up  ­ The parents will become emotionally unable because it is too difficult to cope with these babies ­ Same goes for slow – to – warm up babies ­ Creates less synchrony ­ Parent’s understanding of what is going on and their personality is very important here ­ If they are of a personality that allows them to tolerate the quirks, then the babies will be fine and  there will be secure attachment and synchrony  ­ Secure attachment is predicted by being an easy baby ­ The goodness of fit between the parent’s personality and the baby’s temperament  Stability of Attachment Style  1 Lecture 31 (Thursday, November 29, 2012) ­ If family environment consistent, then attachment is consistent ­ Hamilton (1995) longitudinal study  ▯followed around 30 children from ages 1 t0 17, found that those  children who were unattached at age 1 kept their attachment style, 81% of them maintained their  attachment style, 64% of them maintained a secure attachment style ­ German longitudinal study  ▯82% of the children in their study maintained their attachment style from   age 1 to age 6 ­ If major change in circumstances, then attachment can change as well  ­ Walters et al. (1995) longitudinal study  ▯followed children from age 1 to young adulthood, every  instance of attachment had changed due to traumatic experiences Summary ­ Attachment to primary caregiver is adaptive ­ Formation of affectional bond through child’s signals  ­ Formation of attachment based on parental responding ­ Attachment style usually persists into adulthood ­ Is parent a truly safe base? ­ Effect on friendships, romantic relationships ­ Interactions with  1. Temperament 2. Parenting style Parenting Style ­ Temperament, attachment style, and parenting are all related  ­ Temperament can affect likelihood of secure attachment ­ Parenting can affect likelihood of secure attachment ­ Temperament can affect parenting ­ Parenting can affect temperament Outline ­ Emotional tone of the family  2 Lecture 31 (Thursday, November 29, 2012) ­ Warmth versus hostility ­ Parental responsiveness ­ Methods of control in the family ­ Rules ­ Expectations ­ Punishments  Emotional Tone Warmth Responsiveness Defining warmth versus hostility  ▯show interest  ­ Aka synchrony or sensitivity and excitement, affectionate, sensitive and  empathetic, able to develop synchrony with their  ­ Cognitive benefits  kids, will sometimes deny their kids something  that they want (but they explain way, do it in a  ­ Children who’s parents are high in  responsiveness have higher IQs than those whose  calm, warm way) parents are less responsive  ­ Hostile parents are the opposite ­ Socio – emotional benefits  ­ Kids in high warmth families are more securely  ­ They go to school and get along with other kids  attached at age 2, have higher self – esteem,  and make friends  higher in empathy and altruism, listen to their  parents and do what they say because they know  ­ Altruistic and appropriate, not aggressive  how much their parents love them, less  aggressive, less delinquent, higher IQ scores ­ Kids in low warmth families are the opposite  ­ They tend to have more mental health problems  and suicide ideations  Longitudinal evidence on maternal warmth as a  protective factor (Pettit et al., 1997)  ­ Children who’s mother’s were high in warmth  were less likely to be involved in criminal  activities ­ Children who’s mother’s were low in warmth  were more likely to be involved in criminal  activities  Methods of Control 3 Lecture 31 (Thursday, November 29, 2012) ­ Control is important! ­ There is a need for control in a family, but control in a good way Example  ▯Kurdek & Fine (1994)  ­ Measured the level of control in junior high students ­ They were asked to rate the accuracy of statements, which would estimate the level of control within a  family  ­ These families were rated on their control level and what the researchers found was that the level of  control in a family was correlated with a level of self – esteem and self – efficacy of their children ­ You are getting a model in a way that you can follow later by being controlled by your parents ­ You have to get things done to feel good about yourself ­ Three factors 1. Clarity and consistency of rules ­ Parents who do this tend to have children who are better off than parents who don’t do this  ­ Children without rules can be defiant and it isn’t good for their socio – emotional development  ­ Tend to be confident, sure of themselves, and have fewer behavioural problems 2. Parental expectations ­ There is this movement where parents think that they shouldn’t expect anything of their children, but  this is bad for the children ­ If parents have expectations of their children, the children become more mature and well – behaved  ­ These
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1 and half of page 2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit