Class Notes (835,068)
Canada (508,910)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 2AP3 (481)
Lecture

schizophrenia (3).docx

3 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2AP3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Fall

Description
November 30 , 2012 Psych 2AP3: Abnormal Psychology – Major Disorders Schizophrenia (3) Etiology: Dopamine Hypothesis - hyperactivity of dopamine - neuroleptic drug effects:  effective drugs (phenothiazines) block dopamine receptors in animals  not all patients respond to phenothiazines  phenothuazines work in mania, other psychoses  effect may be indirect - dopamine antagonists reduce symptoms: chemicals that do this have such strong side effects that they are almost never used - dopamine agonists produce symptoms  amphetamine overdose mimics paranoid schizophrenia Problems with dopamine hypothesis - the problem may be too much dopamine, however, when we look at cerebral spinal fluid, if there were too much dopamine in the brain we would expect to see a lot more of the breakdown product, however we don’t - Van Kammen et al (1981) reviewed 12 studies of amphetamine administration:  Expect to see dramatic worsening  25% of patients worsened  46% of patients unchanged  28% of patients improved - MAO inhibitors do not worsen schizophrenic symptoms (Brenner & Shopsin, 1980):  Should have made things worse  3% of patients worsened  71% of patients unchanged  26% of patients improved - hypersensitivity or more of dopamine receptors, especially in the post- synaptic neuron which leads to a functional problem with dopamine? - D2 receptor do have impact on positive symptoms of schizophrenia, if you block D2 receptors you see an amelioration in positive symptoms Etiology: Types I and II - type I: excess dopaminergic activity  positive symptoms predominate  usually acute, good prognosis  no structural brain damage  neuroleptics effective in treatment  probably more of a genetic basis - type II: neuron loss in the brain  Negative symptoms predominate: enlargement in cerebral ventricules  Intellectual impairment  Poor prognosis  Less likely to have a family history of schizophrenia  May be due to perinatal brain damage Etiology: Genetic – twins - mostly relate to type I - kringlen (1967): MZ=45%; DZ=15% - pollin et al (1969): MZ=43%; DZ=9% - gottersman & shields (1972): MZ=57%; DZ=12% - fischer (1973): MZ=56%; DZ:26% - gottesman &shields (1982): MZ=46%; DZ=14% - MZ is much higher than DZ concordance rate - Something else going on in addition to the genetics Etiology: Genetic – Family - child (both parents affected) = 46% - child (one parent, one sib affected) = 17% - child (one parent affected) = 12% - much stronger link between maternal schizophrenia - children (one sib affected) = 10% - parent (one child affected) = 6% - grandchild (one grandparent affected) = 4% - uncle/aunt/niece/nephew = 3% s
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2AP3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit