Class Notes (837,981)
Canada (510,607)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 2AP3 (481)
Lecture 6

6 Lecture 6 - Somatic Symptom Disorder - March 5, 11 - PSYCH 2AP3.docx
Premium

5 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2AP3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
LECTURE 6 PSYCH 2AP3 Somatic Symptom Disorders March 5, 11 2015 − Involve physical symptoms or concern about physical symptoms − No underlying physiological reasons for concerns of symptoms  − Symptoms are real to the individual and taken as real o Factitious Disorder – pretending to have a mental disorder; not the same as somatic symptom disorder  − Little research in etiology and bases of somatic symptom disorders − Less common in the general population  − Prevalence in community samples is relatively small (compared to other disorders) – prevalence in medical settings is high − Lengthy history – going back 3000 years, symptoms found in literature and accounts − Significant in the development in modern approaches to psychological disorders  o Freud began with patients with symptoms of this disorder  − Almost exclusively interpreted in terms of psychological causation/etiology  − Realize the distinction between mind and body – physical symptoms caused by psychological factors  Somatic Symptom Disorders – DSM­5 − Somatic Symptom Disorder – used to be called somatization disorder − Illness Anxiety Disorder – used to be called hypochondriasis; belief that this category will be moved into anxiety disorder; anxiety about physical  presence of disorder − Conversion Disorder (Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder) – disorder Freud began with (19  century); Lengthiest history; previous names –  Hysteria, Conversion Hysteria, − Other Specified Somatic Symptom and Related Disorder  − Unspecified Somatic Symptom and Related Disorder − Psychological Factors Affecting Other Medical Conditions  − Factitious Disorder – pretending to have a psychological disorder; used to be called Malingering Disorder; draws a distinction between lying about  symptoms and having real symptoms without physiological basis Conversion Disorder Conversion Disorder – DSM­5 − One or more symptoms of altered voluntary motor or sensory function o Does not include organ function (involuntary o Involves paralyses with no physiological basis, numbness, blindness, deafness, loss of taste  − Symptom incompatible with recognized neurological or medical condition o Eg/ Freud and neurologists – glove anesthesia; couldn’t feel sensation below the wrist; there is not one set of nerves that cause sensation  on the hand; cannot have nerve damage that simply cuts off sensation for the hand  ▯loss of sensation does not match pattern of innervation − Symptoms not better explained by another medical or mental condition − Symptom causes clinically significant distress or impairment or warrants medical evaluation  − Specification of Symptom Type – note the kind of symptom o Weakness or paralysis  o Abnormal movement (or gait) o Swallowing symptoms o Speech symptoms  o Attacks or seizures; passing out for no reason o Anesthesia or sensory loss (blindness, deafness, loss of feeling) o Special sensory symptoms  o Mixed symptoms Conversion Disorder – Epidemiology  − Population prevalence unknown o No easy way to assess in community – would be impossible to differentiate from real paralysis, weakness etc that have physiological cause o Ford (1983) estimates 20­25 of general medical patients meet criteria   Assume prevalence in community is lower 1 LECTURE 6 PSYCH 2AP3 o DSM­5 estimates 5% of neurology referrals meet the criteria − Disagreement on sex bias o DSM­5 estimates: 2:1 to 3:1 female/male ratio o Prototype = female under 45 from rural or culturally unsophisticated background  Some symptoms that may have worked for patients 150 years ago before extensive knowledge of NS are no longer credible   Little understanding about NS − Usually occurs in early mid­adulthood  Conversion Disorder – Comorbidity − Other somatic disorders  − Anxiety disorders (esp. Panic Disorder, GAD) − Depressive Disorders − Dissociative Disorders = 47% o At one time, conversion disorder and dissociative disorder were in one category o ICD continues to group the two disorders − Obsessive­Compulsive Disorder  − Borderline Personality Disorder − Several features that are not diagnostic, but often seen in connection to symptoms; can help clinicians decide between conversion disorder or  physiological disorder o Seem to function well, given the deficit they are reporting  Eg/ Deafness; yell their name, they will turn to respond – the experience does not reach consciousness, but they can still hear;  they will say they felt an impulse to turn  Eg/ Blindness – able to navigate through cluttered room and not bump into anything  • Also occurs in Blind­sight – physical damage to part of cortex related to visual system; a lot of visual processing  occurs unconsciously; damage to conscious area of cortex; visual information is being processed, but information does  not reach consciousness o La belle indifference – beautiful indifference; seems unconcerned about deficit in many patients; consciously they are not showing  emotion expected; not diagnostic because some patients do show large concern Conversion Disorder Etiology − Ancient Greek’s – believed that hysteria arose because the uterus was wandering around body looking to have a baby − Modern psychoanalysis o Defense against anxiety re conflict (primary gain)  Physical symptoms is less anxiety producing than bringing conflict to awareness; psychological conflict  ▯physical manifestation o Energy from conflict  ▯symbolic somatic loss o Symptoms serve several functions  Masked expression of hidden impulse  Punishment for forbidden impulse   Removal from anxiety­producing situation • Primary gain – ridding of psychological anxiety  Gratify dependency needs; sick role • Secondary gain purpose – external rewards reaped from having a symptom; eg/ illness, blindness – get attention from  others; care, sympathy − No clear behavioural model − Focus on secondary gain o Reinforcement for somatic complaints (attention, nurturance, love) o Does not focus on primary gain – cannot assume internal processes o Increased use of somatic complaints to meet needs − Punishment of verbal expression of emotion leaves no options o I.e. family does not listen to verbal complaints; physical symptoms gain the attention that is needed and wanted  − Behavioural/Cognitive 2 LECTURE 6 PSYCH 2AP3 o Communication – Model 1  Physiological display (thrashing, crying, tantrums) – eventually learn to transfer to verbal display • Some people remain tied to physiological needs and cannot translate into verbal communication of need  Initial innate physical expression of emotion trigger response by Mom o Communication – Model 2  Symptom distracts from internal distress   Symptom signals distract to others  Sy
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2AP3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit