Class Notes (834,807)
Canada (508,727)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 2NF3 (75)
Lecture

Introduction to Neuropsychology.docx

9 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2NF3
Professor
Ayesha Khan
Semester
Winter

Description
January 14 , 2014 Psych 2NF3: Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Introduction to Neuropsychology The Blob ­ No one had a good idea of what controlled behaviour ­ Religion, math, physics, and biology all had their own theories ­ Began from a philosophical perspective History of Neuropsychology ­ Know names mentioned in lecture but not the dates ­ Aristotle (384­322BC): developed a formal theory about what develops and  controls behaviour • When we think about human behaviour, those are a product of the  functioning of the heart rather than the brain • Concept of mentalism: question of where the mind is coming from, mind  is a consequence of the functioning of the heart • Today we think of the main within the context of functioning of the brain,  and because the brain functions as a result you have the main • Where the mind is located was up for debate • Brain was a pulling system, the higher the intellect (from human beings)  associated with the animal the larger the cooling system • Cardiac hypothesis ­ Galen (circa AD 129­199): • Networks, nerves that were running all along the body running to the brain • Refuted the hypothesis that Aristotle was given, the cardiac hypothesis • Mental experiences originate from the blob inside the skull as all the  nerves are directed to the brain • Brain hypothesis • Ventricles, empty spaces within the brain were there is no tissue but  contain fluid, were the most important parts of the brain • Fluid allowed for communication • Cortex was not important • This hypothesis was maintained for hundreds of years as we did not have  the technology or do to the fear of being outcasted by the church ­ Andreas Vesalius (1514­1564): one of the most leading people to document  anatomy • Keeping the ideas of channels or networks • Drawings of how all the tubes, blood vessels, nerves ­ Rene Descarte (1596­1650): • Impressed by the machines of his time • Dualism: brain is important and the mind resides in the brain • Mind resides in the pineal gland • Pineal gland: releases hormones • But the mind is immaterial, it cannot be measured or seen, resides in the  pineal gland and governs behaviour by using the fluids in the body to  allow movement, behaviours • You have a mind and you have a body • Mind­body problem: if we make the assumption that there is this  immaterial mind sitting in a material pineal gland whose actions will cause  change in behaviour, how does something immaterial create spontaneous  energy? Phrenology ­ Two key assumptions: 1. Different regions of the brain, taking into account the tissue found in the  brain, are mediating different behaviours 2. If for whatever region one personality is different then another you can see it  being reflected in different parts of the brain, those parts of the brain would  increase in size. Increased brain tissue in that area allocated to the things you  do more on a regular basis ­ Connecting brain action to a specific behaviour ­ Change as a consequence of brain action Broca’s Area ­ Lateralization: • Lateral: to the side • Having a particular behaviour that is of to one side of the brain ­ Patient that had damage in a specific part of his brain ­ Damage to the left side of the brain located in the frontal lobe on a gyrus ­ Gyrus is the bumps of the brain ­ Inferior frontal gyrus: inferior as it is located towards the bottom ­ Patient had difficulty speaking ­ Using the muscles to produce a particular kind of movement ­ Frontal cortex is associated with movements of muscles associated with speaking ­ Speech was very slow, difficulty getting the words out Werincke’s Area ­ Strict localization: one small area of the brain associated with a particular  behaviour ­ Disagreed with strict localization ­ Agreed with lateralization ­ Patient who had damage to the temporal lobe and also had speech disruption ­ Superior temporal gyrus ­ Superior as it is at the top of the lobe ­ Random words strung together that do not have any meaning ­ Organizing words in a way that have meaning so that the person listening can  understand them ­ When it comes to speech there are multiple aspects of speech: movement  associated with producing sounds, organization of words ­ Auditory information travels from the ears to the temporal lobes, sound  processing occurs in this auditory specific area ­ Sounds are processed into auditory representations in the temporal lobes ­ Auditory representations are moved along the arcuate fasciulus ­ Pathway arcs around the lateral fissure ­ This pathway leads to Broca’s area, where the sound representation are converted  into speech movements ­ What is the sound representation I the temporal cortex? Moving to the frontal  lobe, inferior frontal gyrus for speech movement ­ Movements are sent forward to muscles responsible for producing the appropriate  sound ­ Links the neuroscientific understanding of how the speech/auditory processing  occurring is related to clinical symptoms ­ Aphasia: disruption ­ Wernicke;s aphasia: cannot articulate his ideas in written form ­ Broca’s aphasia: can still use writing capability January 16 , 2014 The Brain Mappers ­ Idea of function being localized became more popular ­ Jorbinian Broadmann (1868­1918) Karl Lashley (1890­1958) & Stephan Franz ­ Needed to understand how it is connected to that function ­ Began making lesions in animals ­ Specific location (engram) for specific memories? • Engram is a representation • Specific locations that encode specific aspects of that memory • Ex.: olfactory, visual ­ Law of equipotentiality: • Memory is distributed throughout the brain • Move from localist perspective to distribution ­ Law of mass action: • Extent of behavioural disturbance depends on how large the injury is Wilder Penfield (1891­1976) ­ Patients undergoing neurosurgery ­ There are no pain receptors in the brain itself ­ We can activate small parts of the brain through small electrical currents, and the  subject who is awake can tell where they are stimulating ­ Brain function and the clinical consequences Wernicke’s Idea of Disconnection ­ Different regions of the brain have different functions ­ But, there is interdependence ­ There is interaction ­ Idea of disconnection (more examples): • Alexia: disconnection between visual areas of the brain and organization,  loosing the ability to read • Apraxia: disconnect
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2NF3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit