Class Notes (838,058)
Canada (510,633)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 3CB3 (58)
Lecture

3CB3 Attitude Formation- Jan. 24th .docx

4 Pages
80 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CB3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Basic Mechanisms of Attitude Formation 01/27/2014 Day 1­ January 24  h How do these attitudes form and change? Exposure Robert Zajonc (1968): first to talk about mere exposure hypothesis; simply experiencing an  attitude object repeatedly was enough to form a positive attitude towards that  object.  Consistent with the saying, “out of sight out of mind.”  His experiment­> used made up words and told participants that they were words in Turkish, exposed  people to these words once OR 25 times.  Later were asked the positive meaning of the word (positive vs  negative based on what they thought these words meant). Low frequency exposure­> only 2 or 3 were rated higher than neutral High frequency­> 25 times exposed words were rated higher.  Used in product advertising Zajonc & Rajecki (1969): random, meaningless words were printed in the Michigan school  newspaper, same results. Real­ World Mere Exposure Effects Mita et al (1977): We prefer mirror image of our face; friends prefer regular face (head on view of  ourself).  Depends on what the individual sees more often. Crandall (1958): We prefer foods we have tasted repeatedly.  Grush et al (1972): In 1972 U.S Congressional campaigns, bigger spender won in 57% of races  (29/51). Get their name and face in the media Familiarity leads to greater liking of the candidate Other demonstrations: drinks, Music, Brand Names, Urban environments.  Monahan, Murphy & Zajonc (2000): presented with a polygon or Chinese character which is  followed by a grey block (masking of the object) so that we do not remember seeing these images.  Testing Phase: Rated liking for the images; presented with the images that had been initially shown behind  the block or similar images or random images not already seen (polygon).  3 Phases: Familiar, Similar and Novel stimuli that the participants were required to rate based on their  liking. Stimuli presented once: old= positively, similar= less positively, new= even less positively. Stimuli presented 5 times: significantly higher positivity for all of the three phases but the most positive  ratings were for the old stimuli.  Multiple exposures to the stimuli significantly increased the liking ratings of all of the stimuli. Unconscious because this affect occurred without remembering seeing these images.  Control: rates everything at about 2.5/5 (neutral) Why Mere Exposure Effect?  Produces positive affect Subjective familiarity: Birnbaum­Mellers: subjective familiarity­liking Familiarity by itself breeds liking­> from frequent exposure Moreland­Zajonc: Subjective recognition plus subjective affect. Frequency­> subjective recognition= familiarity; confidence and accuracy in estimates of frequency. Frequency­> subjective liking; with or without accurate judgments of relative familiarity (does not need  familiarity for liking).  Reduced response competition: presenting an attitude object once gives a lot of possible  responses we may have towards it; but seeing something repeatedly allows us to narrow down the  number of responses you have to the object to just one. Liking= the reducing of competition Stimulus evokes competing responses­> uncomfortable.  Increasing exposure reduces that to one dominant response. Unclear if this is the main mechanism or if it is one of the mechanisms.  Perceptual fluency; ease of processing: the more frequently we experience an object, the more  quickly we can process information about it.  More fluent we get at processing different aspects of the object. More experience with it= faster processing of the object= increased liking.  Fluency/ Activation Model: Activation due to increased accessibility makes all stimulus judgments, 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit