Class Notes (835,108)
Canada (508,934)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture 6

Lecture 6 (January 17).docx

4 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 6 (Thursday, January 17, 2013)  ­ Juries look at false confessions or truthful confessions as relevant and they make an impact whether  they are true or not true  Example  ▯Central Park jogger case Coerced­Internalized False Confession ­ In this case, the person confesses and believes that they committed the crime even though it is not  ­ We don’t really know the circumstances under which this happens ­ Gisli Gudjonsson (British researcher on false confessions) says that there are a few circumstances that  one can attach to cases of coerced­internalized false confessions 1. History of substance abuse ­ This is because the substance abuse has scrambled their brains a little bit  ­ They are more likely to believe through suggestion that they have actually done something that they  have imagined or been told repeatedly about  2. Inability to distinguish between suggestion and personal experience ­ There are also people under aspects of various forms of mental illness that find it very difficult to  separate things that they have actually experienced from things that they have been told ­ They may come to make those memories their own  ­ It is remarkably easy to plant false memories or things that have not happened to you (especially in  children) 3. Anxiety, guilt over something  ­ Due to their anxiety and guilt, they come to think that that something is the crime ­ They then come to believe that they are guilty  Example  ▯Thurstan county ritual abuse case Russano et al, 2005 ­ Study dealing with false confessions and they illustrate from an empirical standpoint (lab work and  field work) that there is a problem with false confessions and what sorts of things we need to be  concerned about ­ Participants (usually undergraduates) come into the lab and they have been told that they are going to  solve a set of problems, write down the answers to them, submit the answers to the researcher, and have  them marked  ­ They’re going to work with another person, who is a confederate of the experimenter who is  pretending to be naïve  1 Lecture 6 (Thursday, January 17, 2013)  ­ They are told that they will both work in the same room and on some of the problems they can work  together, but on other problems specified they have to work alone  ­ There are several conditions here  1. Innocent  ▯nothing happens 2. Guilty  ▯induced by confederate to assist on independent problem  ­ Most participants that are induced by the confederate go ahead and work on the problem  collaboratively when they should be working on it independently  ­ They proceed to submit the answers to the experimenter ­ The experimenter comes back in and he tells all the participants that they believe that the participants  cheated by collaborating on the problems even though they were told to work on them independently  ­ We have some guilty parties here and we have some innocent parties as well  ­ Now what we are looking at is who among these participants, guilty or innocent, will confess to  having cheated even though they did not  1. No tactic  ▯no approach is made they are just told that they are guilty and that it is best if they sign  the confession  ­ 40% guilty confessed ­ 5% innocent confessed 2. Explicit leniency  ▯some of the participants are told that it will be better for them if they sign the  confession that they did cheat, they will still receive credit for participating in the experiment and the  professor won’t be notified of their dishonesty, but will compensate by doing another experiment for no  credit ­ 75­77% guilty confessed ­ 15% innocent confessed 3. Minimization  ▯the experimenter says that it is not a big deal that they collaborated and that he will  not get the professor involved, but if they don’t confess the profe
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit