Class Notes (835,309)
Canada (509,088)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture 7

Lecture 7 (January 21).docx

8 Pages
122 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 7 (Monday, January 21, 2013)  Detecting Deception ­ One of the things that human beings do frequently is lie, we lie to others all the time  ­ Most of these lies are trivial and insignificant, they are essentially white lies  ­ We are interested in deception by suspects and even in witnesses ­ Most people believe that we are reasonably good at detecting liars (literature suggests that we are  better than chance) ­ The problem is developing or finding a methodology in finding a use in a forensic context, which will  allow us to identify liars and truthtellers with sufficient reliability to make it useful in legal cases (this  we have not done yet) Face/Body Cues to Deception?  ­ Both experts and amateurs agree these cues are indicative of lying 1. Avoiding eye contact ­ “Look me right in the eye and tell me…” ­ We assume that people who are lying are not going to be able to look you right in the eye 2. More smiling and laughter ­ We assume this comes in the nervousness of lying 3. Higher rate of eye blinking 4. Nervous fidgeting 5. More illustrative gestures  6. More movement of legs, feet, hands ­ Shiftiness and changing postures in the chair 7. More body, head movements 8. More shrugging  ­ The interesting thing about this is that this list is completely false  ­ None of these can detect lying more than a chance level ­ The problem is that sometimes liars do more of these things that truth tellers do  ­ But under other circumstances, for other people, and perhaps for other reasons, truth tellers do more  of this than liars do ­ Overall, none of these is a particularly good indicator of lying 1 Lecture 7 (Monday, January 21, 2013)  ­ Most of the literature that has looked at these cues have been in laboratory or field situations that have  not been the same as people who have committed crimes  ­ A study done back in 2003 covered over a hundred indicators of lies that covered anybody telling a lie  ­ The literature is based exclusively on studies that typically people engage in some behaviour and then  are asked to fool someone by lying about it  ­ The behaviour that they have engaged in isn’t criminal, which is why they are somewhat realistic  situations ­ In truth, people who have lied in these studies are not going to be in the same psychological situation  as someone who is lying about his/her involvement in a criminal activity  ­ One could argue that these studies underestimate our ability to detect lying because they are trying to  detect it for people for whom the consequences of telling a lie or getting caught at it are relatively  minimal  Working Cues To Deception  1. Liars less forthcoming ­ Liars provide fewer details ­ They are less open about the things that they are talking about ­ Only applies to 60­65% of the liars  2. Liars tell less compelling stories ­ Less detailed stories 3. Liars = more negative impression ­ In general, liars leave a more negative impression in the minds of the person interviewing them or  getting information from them ­ We don’t know what generates that negative impression  ­ People get this impression, but they are unable to explain where they got it from  4. Liars more tense ­ In general, liars show more signs of tension than truth tellers  5. Fewer imperfections, unusual content  ­ Fewer mistakes in grammar and telling their stories ­ There are fewer strange, unusual, unique kinds of information in their stories ­ They are plain stories  2 Lecture 7 (Monday, January 21, 2013)  ­ All of these cues combined don’t give us an accuracy of greater than 60­75% and that is not good  enough for them being indicative of someone’s guilt in a trial  The Language of Deception  ­ What about the way in which the story is told? ­ Here is where we seem to get the most information  ­ Remember watching the video presentations of the person can be deceiving and give the wrong cues  (recall false confession study), the better cues come simply from the audio 1. Verbal immediacy ­ The absence of verbal immediacy Verbal immediacy = present tense, active voice, as if you were in the story and were telling it in the  present ­ Liars tend to go into past tense and demonstrate less verbal immediacy  2. Fewer details in story 3. Impressions of verbal uncertainty ­ They seem to be less certain about the truth or the accuracy of their story 4. Impressions of nervousness 5. Lack of logical structure to story ­ Less logical structure ­ Could be because the liar practiced the story many times 6. Lack of plausibility to story ­ Doesn’t make a lot of sense 7. Raised pitch of speech  ­ Liars tell their stories in a higher pitch than truth tellers do  ­ The problem here is that even though it is a difference found in a number of different studies, the  pitch rise is relatively small (few decibels) so it is very difficult to make that comparison without  having a lengthy voice record of the pitch the individual normally speaks  Detection Easiest When ­ National Research Council (NRC) reported that there are conditions under which lying is easier to  detect by these  3 Lecture 7 (Monday, January 21, 2013)  1. Lies have high personal relevance 2. Stakes of deception are high 3. Liar knows he’s lying ­ This would be the case if a person has been told something or has come to believe something  Example  ▯under hypnosis, false memories are believed just as much as real ones  4. Liar has little chance to rehearse ­ This is why the police will try to interrogate an individual right away to prevent them to rehearsing  their story or collaborate with others if they in fact have something to hide  Ekman, O’Sullivan & Frank (1999) ­ A study of how good people are at detecting deception  ­ Paul Ekman is the world’s leading expert on the expression of emotion  ­ They were showing videotapes to individuals (including federal officers, sheriffs, federal judges,  clinical psychologists with an interest in deception, regular clinical psychologists, and academic  psychologists) ­ They were looking at how accurate they were at detecting falsehood in these videotaped presentations ­ The problem with this study is that determining whether the individual in the videotape was lying or  not depended on whether they had confessed to something  ­ The overall accuracy was very good (60­70%)  ­ It didn’t really matter who you were because they were all consistent  ­ Their accuracy in detecting lies is higher than their overall accuracy  ­ There is a drop in detecting truth  ­ The mistake that we typically make is that we are more likely to think that truth tellers are lying than  liars are telling the truth  ­ We tend to see more innocent people lying than we should, but we are really good at telling who is  lying  ­ Regardless of how much training you have, there isn’t a whole lot of difference between one group of  individuals and another in their ability to detect falsehood  ­ Th
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit