Class Notes (836,128)
Canada (509,645)
Psychology (5,217)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture 18

Lecture 18 (February 25).docx

7 Pages
38 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 18 (Monday, February 25, 2013)  Hicks and Sales (2006) ­ In general, they have three broad critiques of offender profiling models 1. Lack of goals and standards  a) Some models state no goals  ­ There are models that don’t state any goals and when they do, they don’t agree with other models on  what the other offender profiling should be  b) No agreement on goals of profiling ­ Goals should be valuable to the investigator and the initial investigation of the crime, upto the point a  suspect is identified and charged ­ Some models go on to talk about offender profiling being a way to provide ideas about interrogation  strategies for the police  ­ Others talk about additional ways of questioning the suspect when he is tried and not all models agree  on that  c) No agreement on crimes suitable for profiling  ­ If you look at the kinds of crimes that are actually mentioned in the various profiling models, there is  disagreement about exactly what crimes are appropriately ready for profiling  Example  ▯rape typologies are all from the same source (Groth et al.), so it is suitable for profiling,  however not everyone agrees that serial murder is suitable for profiling, some models include it and  some do not (same with arson) ­ There is general disagreement on what crimes you can actually usefully profile with only rape being  agreed upon by all of the models ­ The main reason that rape murder has been taken as a target for all of the models is because of the  initial psychodynamic interpretation of rape as a power crime and because it involves sex (everyone  was keen to use Freudian theory to understand the minds of rapists) ­ Freud put sex and aggression together and this was related to rape since it was rape and murder  d) No standards to evaluate success of profiling ­ Relates to the science of forensic psychology ­ Nobody is able to evaluate the success of profiling or whether any given profile is useful ­ There have been attempts to do this, but in general these attempts suggest that it is not useful ­ One of the FBI’s studies show that only 88 out of 158 cases were solved, only 15% (since it was less  than 50% of solved cases, it was successful 8­9% of the time) of the case were the profiles useful  ­ Other studies have found that the success rate is from 3­5% 2. Use of unclear terms and definitions  1 Lecture 18 (Monday, February 25, 2013)  a) Serial killers defined differently b) Modus operandi sometimes fixed, sometimes changes from crime to crime  ­ There are a wide array of terms that are used in profiling and criminal investigation  Modus operandi = Latin term referring to the way of operating, way of behaving ­ This can mean a couple of different things  ­ Sometimes it is something that remains constant from one offender crime to the next (he always does  this) ­ In other models, it refers to what the individual offender did in this crime which could be different  from what he did in the other crime ­ It could be something that is consistent or different, there is no agreement c) No description of how to determine ‘signature’ ­ Refers to something about the crime that does not change (heavy agreement on this) ­ There is no agreement on where you should look for it or how to determine it  ­ There are many other terms that are either not defined in individual models or when they are defined,  are different than the definitions that other models have come up with  ­ Brent Turvey did try to bring profilers together to settle on some fixed definitions of terms and  developed a journal for profiling, unfortunately both of these efforts have failed 3. Misuse of typologies ­ All systems use typologies a) Inappropriate use of typologies ­ One of the big problems that you even run into abnormal psychology (DSM) Co­morbidity = offender may fall into several categories, so they fail to meet full criteria for any ­ In offender profiling, there is no co­morbidity, what they always do is pick one type and assign the  offender for that ­ The problem is that they don’t give you any kind of criteria to help you to decide which one if there is  co­morbidity  ­ You have a problem because the description for each of the typologies is different and doesn’t  completely overlap b) Inconsistency within typologies  ­ Holmes and Holmes  ▯use pedophile and child molester both as synonyms and as different  ­ They believe that child molesters look for opportunity and if there’s a female that they can molest,  they would do that too, unlike pedophiles who are only sexually abusing children 2 Lecture 18 (Monday, February 25, 2013)  ­ Sometimes, Holmes and Holmes make that distinction, but other times they talk about the terms as if  they are both the same (i.e. a child molester was always a pedophile and vice­versa) ­ It is very inconsistent, even within their own system ­ They also have a categorization about geographically mobile and geographically stable, but they  never talk about it again and they never tell you how mobility versus stability in the geographic  locations of crimes relates to any other aspect of their model (it just vanishes within their model and  they never discuss it again, if you aren’t going to talk about it why is it in there in the first place? What  is it telling you about the offender? Apparently nothing) ­ They have absolutely contradictory descriptions of the offenders also (which doesn’t make sense) c) Overlapping categories ­ A lot of the characteristics of the many typologies overlap from one category to the other ­ Many categories, same characteristics (e.g. single male, use of weapons, etc.) Example  ▯you will always see male as a description of the offenders Example  ▯offenders are usually always from 18 – 25  ­ These are useless descriptions because they don’t distinguish people in the various categories since  they are absolutely the same all the way along  d) Limited values of typologies  ­ The descriptions given in most of these typologies contain relatively little useful information  ­ Don’t help police narrow suspect list; more like horoscope ­ The information given is more like the suspect’s internal psychodynamics (i.e. how is he thinking,  feeling, what are his motives), but that isn’t going to help you narrow down the suspects because you  can’t see motive in a suspect’s internal psychodynamics (not very useful) ­ Hicks and Sales say that these are no better than the daily horoscope in the newspaper in terms of  telling you how your day is going to be like (implying that they are very vague)  4. Rely on intuition, professional knowledge ­ This is no way a scientific ideology of determining suspects, it’s psychic and intuitive, which can be  problematic  ­ Even those models that talk about being scientific, still stress the intuitive nature of things ­ If you take the FBI as a case model, all of the descriptions they give do emphasize the intuitive nature  and the experience you need  ­ Even though they say that intuition and experience is what causes their success, it is not the case as it  is statistical  5. Lack of cl
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit