Class Notes (835,294)
Canada (509,074)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture

Lecture 23 (March 7).docx

7 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 23 (Thursday, March 7, 2013)  Steblay et al (1999)  ­ Meta­analysis of 23 PTP studies  Meta­analysis = took the data from various studies and combined it and re­analyzed it altogether to  determine what conclusions could we draw about the effects (in this case regarding PTP on jury  decision­making) ­ They concluded that 1. Negative PTP increases probability of conviction ­ Participants exposed to negative PTP more likely to judge defendants guilty compared to participants  exposed to less or no PTP 2. Effects greater with jury pool members than students  ­ Larger effects in studies using members of potential jury pool as participants, rather than students 3. Larger effects with real PTP 4. Larger effects with murder, sexual abuse, drug cases 5. Larger when longer PTP – verdict delay  ­ Larger effects in studies with longer delay between PTP exposure and verdict time  Juror Decision Making ­ If we look at this process, we see that there are typical stages that any jury (mostly regarding criminal  cases)  1. Orientation period ­ The jury first meets and does the following a) Elect foreman b) Discuss procedures c) Raise general trial issues ­ All three of these steps generally take an hour or two  ­ If we look at the process that criminal juries follow, we see there are two broad orientations towards  decision­making a) Verdict driven (30%) juries ­ Take poll (either a secret ballot or a show of hands, how many would vote guilty or acquit) ­ Assess evidence for either side (people try to convince the other side that they should vote the way  they believe)  1 Lecture 23 (Thursday, March 7, 2013)  ­ Back and forth discussion to attempt the other side for their side and vice­versa ­ These juries are quick to make a decision because given this process, these types of jury decision­ making does not cover all of the evidence  ­ Considers only the evidence that each side wants to present to the other side as an indication of the  defendant’s guilt or innocence  ­ We get a more rapid verdict here  ­ Less common, but makes for the most dramatic presentation  b) Evidence driven (70%) juries  ­ Majority of juries  ­ More than 2/3s ­ Slower process ­ Look at evidence regarding different verdicts ­ Then takes a poll ­ Go through each of the pieces of evidence they have been given (very over­analytical)  ­ Very thorough in their coverage of their evidence ­ Lengthier, may go on for days 2. Open conflict ­ We now have a point where we have considered all of the evidence or we have presented our  arguments for both sides, now we have the discussion ­ Can get very heated, especially in verdict driven cases  ­ We can infer two kinds of influences to convince the jurors a) Normative influence = our desire as individuals to go along with others, to accept what others  believe in order to maintain harmony, good relations, and be accepted by the group Example  ▯I believe the defendant is guilty, but since 9 of my colleagues believe he is innocent I am  going to vote that way  ­ The jurors mind is not changed about the guilt or innocent about the defendant but the vote changes in  order to match more closely with majority of the jury b) Informational influence = the individual juror actually changes his/her mind based on the  information made by his fellow jury members, the person becomes convinced that the position they  held originally is wrong and they should now vote differently ­ In truth, there is typically not that much change between the juror’s original position to the final vote  that the juror makes 2 Lecture 23 (Thursday, March 7, 2013)  ­ What this does is harden the individual juror’s belief in the correctness of their own position (primary  outcome of these deliberations), make you more certain of your own position  3. Reconciliation  ­ Once we have gone through this argument phase and we have reached a anonymous verdict, we get to  the reconciliation phase Reconciliation = is everyone really okay with this verdict? ­ Then the jury reports that it has a verdict and they report it in an open court ­ People have actually tried to model this process mathematically Bayesian Model ­ We could develop a model to how jurors respond to individual pieces of evidence, this would be a  model of primarily evidence­driven deliberation  1. Prior Probability (P prior ­ Every juror comes in with an estimate of the likelihood that the individual on trial is guilty, we’ll call  that a prior probability of guilt in this model (P prior ­ Some of this probability is going to be shaped by the instructions that the judge gives the jury, in  particular, the presumption of innocence ­ This is a very difficult presumption to maintain because there are biases in the population at large,  which is why the presumption of innocence is reinforced over and over again  ­ This prior probability is also shaped by our attitudes towards the justice system (i.e. do we realize that  it makes mistakes) and our attitudes towards the types and classes of defendants  2. New evidence item ­ What happens next is that there is a sequence of evidence that repeats over and over again ­ In the trial situation, pieces of evidence are presented one by one 3. Probability updating ([(P prior((PE/G= P ]post evidence ­ For each new piece of evidence, the jury has to weigh what its significance is  ­ Our internal meter of guilt or innocence starts at 50%, there is a 50% chance that the individual is  guilty and a 50% chance that the individual is innocent ­ Now we are going to shift that inner mental needle up and down the scale depending on the  implications of each piece of evidence ­ The Bayesian model is the most popular even though it has the least amount of empirical support  Bayesian statistics = based on starting with a prior probability and adjusting that probability based on  new information in a new mathematical way  3 Lecture 23 (Thursday, March 7, 2013)  *Not expected to remember the formula  ­ One significant thing that we need to know about the Bayesian model is that if at any time, that  probability reaches 1.0 (100%) or 0 (0%) it can never change again  ­ Once you get that probability of gui
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit