Class Notes (835,722)
Canada (509,348)
Psychology (5,217)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture

Lecture 24 (March 11).docx

4 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 24 (Monday, March 11, 2013)  Juror’s Evaluation of Evidence 1. Eyewitness testimony ­ Only eyewitness confidence affects jurors’ evaluation ­ This kind of evidence, jurors tend to give it a lot of weight  ­ The defense calls in a psychological witness to explain just how untrustworthy eyewitness testimony  can be  ­ Jurors’ evaluation of its trustworthiness tend to be based exclusively on the confidence that the  eyewitness expresses ­ This is an issue because confidence doesn’t correlate with accuracy of the memory  ­ One of the factors that can influence an eyewitness’ confidence is what kind of feedback they might  get from the police that suggest that they made the right choice  ­ Overall, not good at evaluating ­ People have an unrealistically optimistic view of the accuracy of eyewitness testimony  2. Hearsay evidence Hearsay evidence = a witness is asked to describe any events that he/she actually heard or said ­ Occurs when the witness heard someone else say something relevant to the crime  ­ This kind of evidence is inadmissible and is hearsay  ­ Jurors good at discounting hearsay evidence when they are instructed to do so 3. Confessions  ­ Jurors assign high weight to confessions, even those obtained under coercion ­ Coercion may lead to false confessions  ­ As with eyewitness testimony, jurors give a considerable weight to it  ­ Due to the general tendency that people say what they believe to be true  ­ True even when jurors instructed to ignore, and say they did so  ­ Even when they say that they have ignored the confessions and have given no weight to them, they in  fact have ­ We are not always aware of the factors that have influenced our judgment in any circumstance,  including jury membership  ­ There is often a gray area  4. Expert evidence ­ Jurors influenced even when concepts questionable  1 Lecture 24 (Monday, March 11, 2013)  ­ Sometimes, an expert is talking about something that is not strongly empirically supported and it turns  out upon further investigation that the expert testimony is not reliable and that the constructs that the  expert testimony relies on have not yet been validated ­ Sometimes they depend on subjective judgment  ­ Experts can make mistakes  ­ Jurors ignore information about construct validity  Extra­Evidentiary Factors ­ Jurors are often exposed to pieces of information during trial, which aren’t part of the evidence stream 1. Defendant attractiveness ­ Lawyers have known for centuries that the appearance of a defendant is an important factor in the  jury’s decision about guilt or innocent and even in the severity of the punishment, this is why attorneys  push their clients to dress well  ­ Attractive defendants less likely to be found guilty  ­ Attractive defendants receive lighter punishments ­ Punishment may vary with type of offense a) Harsher on unattractive for robbery, rape, cheating b) Harsher on attractive for negligent homicide, swindling ­ Overall we see a bias on convicted and lenience for convicted attracted individuals 2. Defendant race  ­ No effect on verdicts, overall (if you sum all o
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit