Class Notes (836,581)
Canada (509,857)
Psychology (5,217)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture

Lecture 26 (March 14).docx

9 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 26 (Thursday, March 14, 2013)  Psychological Assessment  ­ Area of clinical and applied psychology, where the amount of data is relatively limited and it tends to  be data about the validity about the assessment instruments ­ This is the area of forensic psychology that is the biggest in terms of the number of people who are  employed and work in this area  ­ Largest segment of forensic psychology by population (75% do clinical or assessment kind of work  and their typical background is a PhD in clinical psychology/counseling psychology) ­ Assessment of individuals with respect to the criminal justice system  ­ Assessment also occurs in the civil courts as well Example  ▯child custody cases ­ In this case, individuals would be assessed based on their fitness as parents and their ability and the  children would be evaluated as well for their interests and preferences  ­ We will be talking about assessment of individuals in the criminal justice system  ­ What we will be evaluating is the state of mind of the defendant, sometimes before trial and  sometimes after conviction Categorizing Assessment  ­ We are looking at the state of mind in three different mind frames 1. Past mental state ­ Assessment of an individual’s state of mind in the past, particularly at the time of the alleged offense  ­ This is relevant to assessments of criminal responsibility or what is called insanity in jurisdictions  outside of Canada NCRMD = not criminally responsible as a result of mental defect, means the same thing as insanity  (Canada) ­ This is the least common evaluation  2. Present mental state ­ This assessment is determined right now  ­ This is relevant to the issue of whether the individual is mentally competent or fit to stand trial at all  3. Future mental state ­ Large body of work done on the future state and mental behaviour of defendants ­ This would be in cases where the individual has been convicted already and in many cases has served  part or his entire sentence  1 Lecture 26 (Thursday, March 14, 2013)  ­ There are several kinds of assessment here but the one to pay attention to is risk of violence  Example  ▯assault type crime, murder, rape leads to risk of violence ­ This is one area of assessment and evaluation to which Canadians have made an enormous  contribution in the literature and in particular by Ontarians Fitness to Stand Trial  ­ What does it mean to be fit or unfit to stand trial? ­ The general criterion for fitness to stand trial is roughly the same in all commonwealth countries  (including Canada) and the U.S. ­ Canadian Criminal Code statement (1992): “Is unable on account of mental disorder to conduct a  defense at any stage of the proceeding before a verdict is rendered or to instruct counsel to do so, and in  particular, unable on account of mental disorder to: 1. Understand the nature or object of the proceedings  2. Understand the possible consequences of the proceeding 3. Communicate with counsel ­ Dusky versus United States (1960): “The test must be whether he has sufficient present ability to  consult with his attorney with a reasonable degree of rational understanding and a rational as well as  factual understanding of proceedings against him.” ­ It is essentially the same thing; the only thing missing from this description is the ability to  communicate with counsel  ­ The Canadian definition is much looser because you only have to fail one of those tests of  competence, but here you would have to fail both (or versus and) Specific Issues in Fitness 1. Understand charges ­ Understanding what the individual is charged with  ­ What behaviour did I engage in or am I alleged to have engaged in within the past that is the basis for  these charges? ­ What is the nature of the crime I am supposed to have committed? 2. Give pertinent information to counsel ­ What did I actually do? ­ Can I describe my behaviour at the time at the time of this alleged offense?  2 Lecture 26 (Thursday, March 14, 2013)  ­ Can I describe the behaviour of the police officers at that time? ­ Can I describe the behaviour of other individuals/witnesses at the scene at the time? ­ Can I provide relevant factual information about the events surrounding the alleged offense to my  counsel? 3. Understand range, nature of penalties ­ Do I understand the range of the nature of penalties? 4. Understand legal strategies and options ­ Do I understand the possible legal strategies and options? Example  ▯the various kinds of pleas that I can make 5. Help choose legal strategies and options  ­ Am I sufficiently rational and sensible to actually make choices between these various options and to  understand and respond to counsel when he/she describes these various responsibilities? 6. Understand adversarial nature of trial ­ Do I understand how a trial works? ­ Do I understand the roles of the various participants in the trial? 7. Show appropriate courtroom behaviour ­ Can the individual manage their behaviour in the courtroom? ­ There are people who may not be able to control their own behaviour  8. Follow trial events, challenge witness ­ Do they have the state of mind to actually follow along with the proceedings? ­ Can they follow along and understand the evidence that is being given (either for or against them) by  witnesses? ­ Are they able to detect problems in witness testimony, which they can then convey to their counsel? 9. Give relevant testimony  ­ Could they give relevant testimony? ­ Is their state of mind such that they can recall the past and accurately describe it without distortion? 10. Maintain relationship with counsel ­ Do they understand the nature of their relationship with their own attorney? ­ Do they know that their attorney is their partner/helper? ­ These are all elements of ability to understand the proceedings and to adequately instruct counsel 3 Lecture 26 (Thursday, March 14, 2013)  Conducting Fitness Assessments ­ How do we assess fitness? ­ There are a number of tests and instruments available to assess competence  ­ 5 days allowed; extension possible to 30 days; detention not to exceed 60 days ­ Typically, an assessment of fitness is ordered by the judge on the basis of either on the request from  the defense counsel or the crown attorney  ­ They will then be sent off to some assessment facility, where 4­5 days will be allowed for the various  kinds of assessment instruments ­ That period of assessment can be extended to about a month if necessary and under rare  circumstances (i.e. situations involving fluctuating/severe symptomatology) to 60 days ­ It cannot exceed 60 days because then they would argue that the defendant is being imprisoned rather  than assessing him  ­ One of the interesting features of the Canadian system of assessment of fitness (in the minds of many  people it is old­fashioned and backwards aspect) is that only medical practitioners (MDs) are allowed  to conduct fitness assessments  ­ Psychiatrists can but not psychologists (even highly trained clinical psychologists) ­ In theory, any medical doctor is eligible to conduct an assessment of fitness, even if they have no  experience with mental health, they are still in the Canadian law eligible to conduct a fitness  assessment  ­ Invariably, a fitness assessment is done by a psychiatrist in modern time because they are a medical  professional who is trained in mental health Four Types of Fitness Instruments ­ These are the general assessment tools 1. Tests for psychopathy ­ These would be used both in assessing for fitness and in assessing for criminal responsibility/insanity ­ There are a number of instruments that are specifically designed to assess specific aspects of  psychopathology, particular kinds of mental disorder a) MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) ­ Oldest and most common ­ On its second revision  ­ Goes back to the 1940s 4 Lecture 26 (Thursday, March 14, 2013)  ­ Very long test (500 items) b) MCMI (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory)  ­ Especially useful for personality disorders 2. Neuropsychological batteries ­ Another reason to be unfit mentally prior to trial is if the individual has actually suffered some brain  damage ­ There is something physiologically wrong with the individual, whether it happened recently or years  ago, it doesn’t matter Neuropsyc
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit