Class Notes (838,041)
Canada (510,648)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2 (January 9).docx

6 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 2 (Wednesday, January 9, 2013)  Forensic Psychology Timeline ­ Ironically, the history of forensic psychology begins in fiction ­ 1842  ▯Edgar Allen Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue” featuring M. Auguste Dupin ­ The first fictitious reference to forensic psychology ­ Poe has been credited with writing the very first murder­mystery story in the history of the world ­ In this particular story, he works to solve a couple of murders in Rue Morgue and he does so by  profiling the offender based on aspects of the crime, witness testimony, etc. ­ At the end, he concludes that the murderer was not a human being at all, but an orangutan, who he  apprehends anyways ­ Ironic because 1. Forensic psychology appeared in fiction before it appeared in fact 2. The first aspect of forensic psychology would be the least important one (offender profiling) ­ 1887  ▯Sherlock Holmes story “A Study in Scarlet” appears ­ The world’s most famous fictional detective and part­time profiler appears  ­ It was a classic example of profiling in fiction  ­ 1888  ▯Dr. Thomas Bond provides first offender profile in London’s Whitechapel murders case ­ The first real life appearance of profiling within forensic psychology  ­ It is better known as the Jack the Ripper murders  ­ This was an unsolved murder case where 5­6 young women in the east end of London were savagely  murdered ­ At one point the media/police received a letter from the killer signed Jack the Ripper (how the name  came about) ­ Today, most experts believe that the Jack the Ripper letter was a hoax ­ 100 years after the case, there were a handful of books that appeared in North America reporting to  identify the individual who was responsible for the murders  ­ It was one of the first profiles that was generated  ­ 1895  ▯In U.S., James McKeen Cattell conducts research on memory accuracy ­ The psychology of those involved in the legal system (police, lawyers, crown attorneys, witnesses,  jury, etc.) ­ Most of forensic psychology is about the psychology of these individuals ­ This was the first instance of work done in that area  1 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, January 9, 2013)  ­ He found what is now the accepted opinion that memory is not all that accurate ­ The greater the distance or time in between the event and the recall, the worse the accuracy is  ­ If leading questions are asked about events, accuracy decreases  ­ If strong emotions are involved in a crime or event, accuracy decreases even more  ­ The very worst possible kind of memory revolves around criminal activity ­ A lot of these individuals are German or trained in Germany because psychology as a science began in  Germany  ­ 1901  ▯William Stern conducts research on eyewitness testimony and leading questions  ­ He came to the conclusion that high emotion and distance in time and space from the remembered  event degraded memory ­ In particular, leading questions can significantly impact the accuracy of testimony ­ This is why leading questions are forbidden in court cases in Europe and North America Leading questions = a question which suggests the answer  ­ 1908  ▯Hugo Munsterberg publishes “On the Witness Stand”  ­ A man from Harvard University (originally from Germany) ­ Published the first forensic psychology book called “On the Witness Stand”  ­ For the very first time he talks about the important role that psychologists could play in helping the  legal system do its job  ­ Discusses the role between psychology and law ­ 1916  ▯Lewis Terman’s Stanford­Binet IQ test used to assess police/fire applicants in California  ­ He is best known for his work on intelligence developed in Paris into English ­ This is still widely used but it is not the most widely used ­ He used it to assess the applicant’s police positions/applicants in California ­ This is a big area in forensic psychology that is used to assess members of the police force ­ Big area in the field of applied psychology ­ 1923  ▯In Frye vs. United States, W. Marston provides expert testimony regarding polygraph results ­ We are now getting into the area of expert testimony by psychologists for legal purposes ­ Larson (came up with the polygraph test) came up with his idea with influences from Marston  ­ In this polygraph case, the evidence was not admitted because it was not the standard for expert  testimony and for the process 2 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, January 9, 2013)  ­ It said that only processes that are widely accepted in its field can be used for the basis of expert  testimony ­ At this time the polygraph test was not well­established in it’s field that’s why this testimony could  not be added to evidence ­ Polygraph tests are still not used as evidence up until this day because their accuracy is questionable  ­ 1954  ▯U.S. Psychologists testify regarding affects of segregation in Brown versus Board of Education ­ There was relatively little activity in forensic psychology before the second world war ­ One of the main reasons for that was because courts in the US had decided that when it came to  mental health issues, anything having to do with psychiatry would have to be testified by a M.D., even  if the M.D. didn’t have specific training in psychiatry  ­ They weren’t recognized in the medical field  ­ 1962  ▯in Jenkins vs. United States, court recognizes testimony of psychologists regarding mental  illness ­ Finally, they were recognized ­ The court ruled t
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit