Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Psychology (5,217)
PSYCH 3CD3 (124)
Lecture

February 27

5 Pages
60 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CD3
Professor
Jennifer Ostovich
Semester
Winter

Description
Thursday February 27, 2014 PSYCH 3CD3 Positive moods are associated with the use of cognitive shortcuts in various types of  information processing More likely to use stereotypes Happy people don’t want to think deeply about things, conserve their effort for things that  keep them in their nice, happy state Buzzkill, Thinking deeply if it will prolong their mental state Negative moods are more likely to be present in out­group relations Negative behaviours, reinforce negative stereotypes What About Negative Moods? Seems to depend on what mood we are putting them into Fear, anger and anxiety are associated with more peripheral, less central processing Relying on heuristics versus deeply thinking through Sadness is very different, it is one of the only emotions not associated with an increase in  arousal Appears to be associated with central processing ‘Depressive Realism’: ruminate more deeply, they think through whether they are  fabulous, and come to more realistic conclusions Does this carry over to stereotypes? Bodenhasuen, Sheppard & Kramer Same methodology as in happiness experiment 1 Mood manipulated in a 12 minute writing assignment Different moods are  Vividly recall a situation that makes you very angry Sadness: vividly recall a situation that has made you very sad Call and explain the mundane events of your day yesterday Do judgment task Neutral mood people did not alter their guilt rating Angry people picked more guilty Sad people don’t appear to use the stereotype in making their judgement Important to know what the negative mood is Heightened arousal in angry, fearful people Racing thoughts, less information processing, low motivation to be fair to anything Fight or flight, not stop and think Interesting implications because it doesn’t usually make us sad when we are faced with  out­groups Being around an out­group member is going to produce the other negative feelings Feel anxious, be a jerk The extent to which we engage in systematic processing is associated with the extent of  stereotype use One emotion, sadness, is associated with more central processing Happy people use heuristics a lot, tend to be jerks because the heuristics are ‘jerky’ There is a good emotional reason that prejudice still exists Motivation can override the effects of happiness, fear, etc. Accountability: motivation not to be prejudiced Through dissonance reduction, we might not realize the things we do Should be able to suppress stereotype use when we are in some of these mood states This is all very complicated Cognitive Control of Stereotype Use If we are going to be held accountable for our judgment, we will think deeply This is a self­ish reason We might not want to look prejudice because we don’t want to look bad, but might want  other people to treated fairly as well Skinhead Dr. O’s spreading activation network Anti­Semite, mean, bald, violent She feels fear, anxiety, discomfort, disgust These also get activated just thinking about skinheads Think about holocaust Some target will activate a whole bunch of emotions and cognitions  SANs contain linked concepts in LTM The more practiced a link, the longer and stronger it will be activated The red links in Dr Os map will be activated most quickly The more she practices these, the easier it will be to activate them, the strength of the  activation will grow All of the red things pop up, but maybe violent, Anti­Semite and Nazi are the strongest She might be more likely to go in the Nazi direction than the Doc Marten direction Different links are going to be practiced to different extents What Types of Links are Most Likely to be Practiced? Things that are engrained in your culture Practice the stereotypes that are the most culturally relevant  If you are getting a lot of experience with a certain group, and you don’t like them, then  your activation network w
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CD3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit