Class Notes (783,538)
Canada (480,727)
Psychology (4,819)
PSYCH 3UU3 (16)
Lecture

Visual Word Recognition

4 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

School
McMaster University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3UU3
Professor
Karin R Humphreys
Semester
Winter

Description
January 29 , 2014 Psych 3UU3: Psychology of Language Visual Word Recognition Visual Word Recognition ­ Taking the perceptual input, organizing it, mapping it on to a word form in your  lexicon, and accessing the meaning ­ Usually termed lexical access ­ Reading sentences in which only the first and last letter are in place • Reading and larger process of reading (connecting words) • Support from top down processes • Much slower • Grammatical and semantic support • Predictable text  • First letter more important • Larger words • Testimate to how good we are at reading ­ Some aspects in common with spoken word recognition, some differences • Difference input modalities • Rapid fading in spoken word recognition not visual word recognition • Developmental: learn to speak an listen before we read, people are much  better • Reading problems are more common • As a species we’ve been doing spoken language longer than reading and it  is more evolved in the sense that we have been optimizing it to work in  our brains • Letters in written system sound differently in some language ­ To what extent does studying visual word recognition help us to understand  spoken word recognition • Easier • What we know about visual can tell us about spoken ­ What aspects do they have in common • Lexical axis Methods ­ Used to look at visual word processing/reading ­ Eye movements • Saccades: jumping movements the eyes make • Fixation times: how long you spend on each part of a  sentence/word/region • Foveal vs. para­foveal vs. periphery: nearly all reading is only foveally • English – can take in15 characters to the right of fixation, 4 to the left • Often jump back but we do not realize: signals about how hard or how  difficult, has to do with ambiguity (not sure of meaning), slow down when  things become more difficult to process or jump back • Also, look at regressions How Does an Eyetracker Work ­ Eyelink 2: sits on the head and has two cameras that sit under the eyes and take  pictures on the eye • Can move the head around • Trackers on the screen • Eyetracker pays attention to where the head is compared to the screen • Cameras look at the pupil and can tell where exactly your looking on the  screen • Good for reading Eye Movements ­ What can these tell us: • See where people fixate, the order that they jump • When they go back • Tend to miss function words • Looking at the main words, content words • Done a lot with reading • For example: looking on webpages, where do people actually look in the  regions • Regions of interest (ROI): how often do they look at different sections • Are people seeing what you want them to see • Being used in business  Reaction Times (and Errors) ­ Naming times • Say window • Do not need to know the meaning or thought about the meaning • Do not need to necessarily recognize the word, give nonsense word ­ Lexical decision times • Is window a word? Is wrndow? • Easy to record react times • More common • Meaning is not important: do not have to think deeply about it ­ familiarity • Have to match to something you have in your head somewhere ­ Categorization times • Is a window alive or not alive • Match to a word • Access to phonology is not required • Access to meaning ­ Access different levels of information  ­ Different tasks tap into diff
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3UU3

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit