Class Notes (835,574)
Canada (509,252)
Brock University (12,083)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2 (September 19).docx

9 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2C03
Professor
Stefan Rodde
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 2 (Wednesday, September 19, 2012) – Rule Utilitarianism Act Utilitarianism Act utilitarianism = an action is right if it maximizes that utility or minimizes the disutility of the  greatest number of people  Utility = meaning happiness, benefits, pleasure, etc. ­ There are a few problems with act utilitarianism 1. Practical problems ­ Will actions actually minimize/maximize utility (need to consider every person involved) ­ Determining maximum utility for all people is quite impossible in some cases  Example  ▯if you’re president, you have thousands and thousands of people to consider ­ It is very hard to consider every single person 2. Theoretical problems a) Special relationships and special duties problem ­ Our aim is to maximize utility for the greatest number of people (without giving privilege to anyone) ­ There’s a problem with this  ▯people think they have special duties/obligations to people like family or   friends ­ Act utilitarianism thinks that we shouldn’t consider those special people Example  ▯mountain climbing problem: the rope breaks, you can save your friend or stranger, but the  stranger has more knowledge and can help you ­ Most people would save the friend even if there is less utility  Example  ▯a lawyer has a client, the lawyer knows his guy is guilty, but needs to defend him ­ This is a special duties problem  ­ If following act utilitarianism, they should tell the truth that they’re guilty ­ Usually though, they’ll lie and not tell the truth b) Free – rider problem Example  ▯the bus free – rider problem ­ Act utilitarianism would allow a free ride c) Justice problem ­ Allows to sacrifice the minority for the sake of the majority 1 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, September 19, 2012) – Rule Utilitarianism ­ Can we really sacrifice the sake of the minority to help the majority? Example  ▯man in room 306, he is in good health, and can save the 5 hurt people if they cut him up ­ There is no justice in killing him and taking his organs John Stuart Mill ­ Differences between act utilitarianism and rule utilitarianism ­ The principle of utility in act utilitarianism is the right action (maximize the utility for the greatest  number of people? Do it.)  ­ The principle of utility in rule utilitarianism is considering the moral rules before considering the right  action (what do the rules advise me to do in this particular situation? If they tell you to do it, you do it.  What makes the rules genuine though? Utility justifies rules, and the rules justify actions)  Rule Utilitarianism ­ The principle of utility determines whether a moral rule is genuine/spurious ­ A moral rule whose general observance tends to maximize utility or minimize utility is genuine Example  ▯Mountain climbing with best friend and stranger. The stranger is much better (volunteers,  sponsors children, etc.). Do you save your friend (who does nothing) or the stranger? ­ According to rule utilitarianism, who should you save? ­ Are we happier living knowing that you save your friend? Are you happier knowing that you saved  your friend? Then it would be a correct thing to do  ­ Act utilitarian: save the stranger ­ Rule utilitarian: a rule that says you have special obligations to your friend Example  ▯Suppose that a bus company uses the honour system. According to rule utilitarianism, is it  wrong to take a free ride? ­ If you’re guaranteed nobody will catch you, is it okay? With rule utilitarianism, yes it would be.  You’re happier because you’re not paying anything. ­ Nobody else is made worse by your decision, so it’s okay ­ If only one person does this, it won’t affect anyone ­ Rule utilitarianism would say it is not okay to take a free ride ­ As long as your action isn’t affecting anyone else’s utility, it’s okay to do 2 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, September 19, 2012) – Rule Utilitarianism Example  ▯You have 5 patients, each need an organ. There’s someone healthy in room 306 who can  help them all. If you leave him he’ll live, or you can take everything and kill him. According to rule  utilitarianism, what should you do? ­ Rule utilitarianism says that you should not kill the healthy person because the rules say that we can’t  do it ­ We are happier living in a society where doctors are not allowed to chop people up, therefore you  should not do this to a healthy person ­ Rules can be related to laws, religion, or also can be informal (like ‘help your friends’) ­ Rule utilitarianism acknowledges that rules can change ­ With changing societies and human interaction, rules can change over time ­ You also don’t have to do the math that comes with act utilitarianism, it is easier to be moral with rule  utilitarianism  Problems With Rule Utilitarianism  Example  ▯You take care of a large number of children. The children are hungry and there is no way  that you will be able to feed them unless you steal food. According to rule utilitarianism, is it morally  permissible to steal food to feed the starving children? ­ There is a rule that states “do not steal,” we would all be happier in a society where people don’t steal  ­ Or, there could be a rule that says that people are dependent on you (so you must feed the children) ­ No, it’s not okay because the rule utilitarianism approach seems to fetishize rules ­ Yes, it is okay because rule utilitarianism seems to fall back into act utilitarianism (only for  maximizing the greatest number of people/utility) Competing rules problem = one rule tells you not to steal, while one tells you to care for your children ­ Then they would consider the amount of utility, or create a hierarchy of the rules (which one is more  important to follow?) Example  ▯thou shall not steal versus you must feed your children, which rule is most important to  follow? ­ Good rules maximize utility, bad rules don’t  Deontological Ethics Utilitarianism = rightness/wrongness based on the consequences 3 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, September 19, 2012) – Rule Utilitarianism Deontology = consequences are morally irrelevant ­ Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804) ­ Focusing on deontological ethics based on Kant’s ethical theories ­ There are two conditions for moral action 1. Right intentions 2. Right motives Right Intentions Right intention = you must intent to do the right thing ­ How do we determine what we should and should not do? 1. Universal law formulation Universal law formulation = “I ought never to act, except in such a way that I can also will that my act  should become a universal law.” – Page 29 in the textbook ­ Moral rules (laws) are supposed to be universal ­ If it cannot be universal/followed by everyone it is not a real rule and should not be followed ­ A general moral rule should be universally followed by everyone, if you have a rule that cannot be  followed by everyone, it is not a genuine rule Maxim = a general principle which specifies how I conceive of an action and my reason for doing it Example  ▯Whenever I am hungry, I’ll eat. Whenever I make a promise, I’ll keep it. Whenever I can  gouge out someone’s eyes without being punished, I will do it.  ­ Any action can have a maxim ­ Every maxim can be correlated to a general rule Example  ▯The maxim: “Whenever I make my promises I will keep them” correlates with the rule  “keep your promises.” ­ But which of these rules are genuine? ­ Every action falls under some sort of rule/maxim ­ Determine which rules we ought to follow and which ones we ought not to with the categorical  imperative  Categorical imperative = a way of evaluating motivations for action 4 Lecture 2 (Wednesday, September 19, 2012) – Rule Util
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2C03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit