Class Notes (839,113)
Canada (511,191)
Brock University (12,137)
Joe Larose (15)
Lecture 18

Lecture 18 (November 21).docx

4 Pages
72 Views

Department
Religious Studies
Course Code
RELIGST 2I03
Professor
Joe Larose

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 18 (Wednesday, November 21, 2012) – Jain Stories: Family Ties  ­ Is it ever the goal to have the entire religious community renounce the world? ­ If this were the case nothing would get done because no one would be part of the society ­ One renunciate requires a lot of support in the community  ­ Yes, but not everyone can because how many people can actually renounce the world  ­ It has to be attractive enough that people will do it, but it still has to be exclusive and not open to  everyone    Lobhadeva  ­ The same motif in two different stories and traditions ­ These stories are built out of other stories ­ A story about the dangers of greed  ­ There is a Jain intro and a Jain moral attached to it ­ In this particular story, he starts off by making (252) a good profit for his horses ­ But then he hears the story about how people make more money and then he is down into that as well ­ So he starts small and then finishes big ­ He ends up killing his business partner because he doesn’t want to share his wealth with him  ­ So he goes through some difficult karmic consequences ­ Lobhadeva has been standing in the king’s court and the Jain ascetic says that he has been up to no  good ­ The Jain ascetics are able to see the karmic consequences of things  The Prince Who Loved Sweetmeats  ­ A reminder that you should not identify with your body ­ There’s a prince who eats a bunch of candy and he falls asleep and he starts farting and it starts to  stink ­ 258: in the body even the most delicious sweets turn to shit… ­ This reminds us about the debate between the Jain ascetic and Chandakarma, who didn’t believe the  soul existed  The Monk Sukasala 1 Lecture 18 (Wednesday, November 21, 2012) – Jain Stories: Family Ties  ­ Jainism similarly echoes the Buddhist biography ­ The mother doesn’t want her son to renounce so she keeps him locked inside ­ The father is already a monk and has renounced ­ This is a king, queen, prince scenario  ­ In the biographies of Mahavira, renunciation and other aspects of his life are celebrated ­ He doesn’t want to cause any injuries to his parents ­ It is also articulated that he got married and had a child because he had to (dharma)  ­ This clearly didn’t become the norm in Jain tradition because monks and nuns don’t wait until their  parents die  ­ The son renounces against the wishes of his mother and distances himself from his mother  ­ The mother dies harbouring evil thoughts and she is reborn tired in the woods and takes on an animal  birth and ends up killing her own son  ­ Sukasala dies in steadfast meditation and doesn’t lose his composure (very peaceful)  ­ The importance of how you conduct yourself at the moment of your death in Indian religion plays a  huge role in what type of rebirth you will take (apparently independent of your karmic consequences) ­ You see this in Buddhist literature as well  ­ There are ways that you can die well and ways you can die poorly  ­ Sukosala’s father is also a monk, so when Sukosala renounces the world he is joined by his father  Sundari  ­ Demonstrates family as an obstruction to taken on the renunciates life ­ Story of a woman
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit