Class Notes (834,664)
Canada (508,678)
Brock University (12,083)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3 (January 23).docx

7 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 3 (Wednesday, January 23, 2013) – Medicalized Death Review ­ Examined various cultural/historical perspectives of death beginning with traditional cultures ­ Death no an end/change of social status ­ Concern for dead predates written history (Atapuerca) ­ Cause of death – ecological orientation (seen and unseen aspects) ­ Power of the dead – dead are often allies (shamans, necromancy)  ­ Names of dead – name avoidance  ­ Examined various cultural/historical perspectives of death in Western culture ­ Universe bound together by natural and divine law (400’s influenced by Christianity) ­ Death as collective destiny of humankind – not an end ­ Changing perspective influenced by emphasis of individual ­ WWI – major turning point – technology – “medicalization of death and dying” ­ Dying and the deathbed scene – dying was public event (5  century) ­ Emphasis on individual and destiny in afterlife – angels/demons battle for soul (approximately 12   th century)  ­ Emphasis from dying person to survivors (immortality and reunion)  th ­ Rituals of dying overtaken by technological process (mid 20  century) st ­ Technological process challenged by initiatives in end of life care – hospices/pallative care (21   century)  ­ Burial customs ­ Graves situated on outskirts of villages beginning in Roman times – burial within settlements special ­ Christian Martyrs powerful – both martyrs and saints helped avoid sin and hell ­ Charnal houses/ossuaries/effigies/catacombs ­ Badone reading  A World Without Death ­ General consequences of a world without death 1. Overcrowding 2. Enforced birth control 1 Lecture 3 (Wednesday, January 23, 2013) – Medicalized Death 3. New relationship laws 4. Conservative society 5. Impact on economic structure 6. Changed moral beliefs and practices 7. Radical changes in death aspects 8. Ecological issues ­ Personal consequences of a world without death 1. Organization of life 2. Free from “fear of death” 3. Extension of personal relationships 4. Ideas about purpose and meaning might change  ­ Individual and societal patterns of functioning are connected with death one way or another (the main  point)  Example  ▯think about enforced birth control, if no one dies, then no one can be born ­ Causing more abortions  ­ Such technologies would be reserved for the elite  Defining Death  ­ At first the definition may seem obvious, the person is dead and the body is disposed of ­ As soon as we ask what it means to be dead, this simple definition unravels and becomes quite  complex ­ In the comic, death means that the living thing is no longer moving  ­ Sometimes mistaken death happened, so people were buried with poles attached to attention devices  that would let others know if they were buried alive Death as Symbolic Construction Symbol = any object, act, even, person, idea, narrative that conveys meaning ­ Anthropologist Clifford Geertz and sociologist Peter Berger argue that all human societies use  symbols to create or construct meaningful understandings of the world ­ Geertz  ▯religions are systems of symbols that provide a meaningful orientation for the believer 2 Lecture 3 (Wednesday, January 23, 2013) – Medicalized Death ­ Shape believers’ interpretation of life experiences, including death ­ These interpretations or definitions are human constructs embedded in words, concepts, and ways of  thinking available in particular societies at particular historical moments ­ Thus, definitions of death vary within Western society and cross­culturally  Changing Definitions of Death in the West ­ Over latter half of 20  century, definition of death in our society has changed as a result of changes in  biomedical technologies ­ The major turning point in history was WWI, which brought forth the technologies in death and dying  ­ Biomedicine plays key role in defining death in our society, separating it from life  Conventional Signs of Death Brain death = irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem Clinical death = determined on the basis of either the cessation of heartbeat and breathing or the criteria  for establishing brain death Cellular death = the death of cells and tissues of the body, which occurs as a progressive breakdown of  metabolic processes, resulting in irreversible deterioration of the affected systems and organs of the  body ­ We die because our cells die ­ Without oxygen, cells vary in their survival potential * Be able to distinguish between these for midterms  Advanced Signs of Death ­ Lack of eye reflexes Algor mortis = the fall of body temperature Livor mortis = purple/red discolouration as the parts of the body settle Rigor mortis = rigidity of the muscles  ­ In a biological sense, death is a sensation of life that is due to metabolic processes, some parts of the  body stop functioning but others can be alive with technologies (for organ donation)  Robert Veatch 3 Lecture 3 (Wednesday, January 23, 2013) – Medicalized Death ­ “Death means a complete change in the status of a living entity characterized by the irreversible loss  of those characteristics that are essentially significant to it.” ­ The first level is defining death ­ This quote encompasses all living things ­ It can also be metaphorical (relate to society and institutions) ­ The second level is what is so significant about life that its loss is coined death (see next section), so  there is some sort of loss ­ The third level is where we should look for some sort of change ­ The fourth level is what tests or criteria are applied  Approaches to the Definition and Determination of Death 1. Irreversible loss of flow of vital fluids  ­ With this understanding of death one looks to the heart, blood systems, lungs, and respiratory tracts as  the locus of death ­ To see if one is dead, they would look at the breathing, feel the pulse, and hear the heartbeat ECG = records the heart’s electrical heart activity ­ It is adequate for defining death in most instances today  2. Irreversible loss of the soul from the body ­ Used for many cultures around the w
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit